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Evolution of Rewriting Rule Sets Using String-Based Tierra

  • Komei Sugiura
  • Hideaki Suzuki
  • Takayuki Shiose
  • Hiroshi Kawakami
  • Osamu Katai
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2801)

Abstract

We have studied a string rewriting system to improve the basic design of Tierra. Our system has three features. First, the Tierra instruction set is converted into a set of string rewriting rules using regular expressions. Second, every agent is composed of a string as the genome and a set of string rewriting rules as its own instruction set. Third, a genetic operation and selection of rewriting rules are introduced to allow the agents to weed out the worst rules. We carried out experiments on how agents evolve through self-replication. The results have shown that our system can evolve not only the agents’ genomes but also the rewriting rule sets.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Komei Sugiura
    • 1
  • Hideaki Suzuki
    • 2
  • Takayuki Shiose
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kawakami
    • 1
  • Osamu Katai
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of InformaticsKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.ATR Human Information Science LaboratoriesKyotoJapan

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