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Radioactive Substances

Chapter
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Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 3 / 3A)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to show how to assess the detriment resulting from the release of radioactive materials to the environment. Because of the wide range of the subject and the limitation of space the chapter consists of little more than a listing of principles and concepts. A more adequate examination of these will require consulting the literature cited.

Keywords

Dose Equivalent Deposition Velocity Radioactive Substance Radiological Protection Fuel Reprocess 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Glossary

ALI

Annual Limit on Intake the activity of a radionuclide which, taken alone, would irradiate a person, represented by Reference Man, to the limit set by the ICRP [7]

Class D, W, Y

(days), (weeks), (years) a classification scheme for inhaled material according to its rate of clearance from the pulmonary region of the lung [7]

DAC

Derived air concentration equals the ALI for inhalation (of a radionuclide) divided by the volume of air inhaled by Reference Man in a working year (i.e. 2.4 × 103 m3) (Bq m−3) [7]

IL

Investigation Level a value of dose equivalent or intake above which the results are considered sufficiently important to justify further investigation ([3], par. 151, p. 29)

Reference Man

A person with the anatomical and physiological characteristics defined in the report of the ICRP Task Group on Reference Man [30]

AGR

Advanced gas cooled reactor

BWR

Boiling water reactor

CANDU

Canadian deuterium uranium reactor

GCR

Gas cooled reactor

HTGR

High temperature gas cooled reactor

HWR

Heavy water reactor

LMFBR

Liquid metal fast breeder reactor

LWR

Light water reactor

NPD

Nuclear Power Demonstration reactor

NFS

Nuclear Fuel Services reactor

PWR

Pressurized water reactor

BEIR

Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council (USA)

BNWL

Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (USA)

EML

Environmental Measurements Laboratory (USA) (formerly HASL)

HASL

Health and Safety Laboratory (USAEC)

IAEA

International Atomic Energy Agency

ICRP

International Commission on Radiological Protection

ICRU

International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements

LASL

Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (USA)

MRC

Medical Research Council (UK)

NCRP

National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (USA)

ORNL

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (USA)

SCOPE

Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment of the International Council of Scientific Unions

USAEC

United States Atomic Energy Commission

UNSCEAR

United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation

USNAS

United States National Academy of Sciences

WASH-1400

USAEC Reactor Safety Study (draft) 1974

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Biological SciencesNational Research Council of CanadaOttawaCanada

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