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Inorganic Pigments

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Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 3 / 3A)

Abstract

In contrast to dyes inorganic colorants are generally used as pigments rather than in a molecular-dispersed state. Besides imparting color for decorative, indicatory and informational purposes, such pigments may serve various other or additional purposes like corrosion protection, filling or reinforcement.

Keywords

Paint Film Inorganic Pigment Lead Chromate Anticorrosive Pigment Zinc Chromate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.II. Institut für Technische ChemieUniversität StuttgartStuttgart 80Federal Republic of Germany

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