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High-Frequency Dynamic Force Microscopy

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Part of the NanoScience and Technology book series (NANO)

5.4 Summary and Outlook

This chapter focused on the emerging trend of high-frequency DFM using small cantilevers or higher vibration modes. The key elements were:
  1. 1.

    Focusing of the laser beam to allow the use of micron-sized cantilevers

     
  2. 2.

    High-frequency detection where the signal-to-noise ratio is obtained by narrow-band homodyne methods or heterodyne methods

     
  3. 3.

    Photothermal excitation of the cantilever vibration, which is effective above 10 MHz, and is also effective in water for avoiding spurious signals.

     
  4. 4.

    Cantilever fabrication methods to realize cantilevers with a spring constant in the 100–1000N/m range, and with a natural frequency in the megahertz range.

     

The combination of high-frequency DFM and small and stiff cantilevers allows a wider range of imaging parameters to be chosen, resulting in higher resolution and the choice of interaction between the tip and the sample, and represents the future of DFM.

Keywords

Surface Acoustic Wave Force Gradient Atomic Force Microscope Cantilever Lateral Force Microscopy Cantilever Array 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Industrial ScienceUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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