The ten most important biomedical engineering devices

Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 14)

Abstract

The most important biomedical engineering devices are those that save the most lives and/or improve the lives of the most people. (1) The X-ray machine images internal organs and thus discovers internal abnormalities and tumors in time to remove them. (2) Computed tomography generates slice images of internal organs with improved contrast and spatial resolution. (3) Magnetic resonance imaging generates slice images of soft tissue and internal organs without radiation exposure. (4) The heart-lung machine oxygenates and pumps the blood to permit operations on the open heart to correct abnormalities and to replace diseased valves. (5) The artificial kidney extracts urea from the blood to extend the lives of those with end-stage kidney disease so that some have time to receive a kidney transplant. (6) The electrosurgical unit makes tissue cutting easier to shorten surgical time and cauterizes tissue to prevent blood loss. (7) The cardiac pacemaker stimulates the dysfunctional heart and restores proper rhythm to many who otherwise would be invalids or die. (8) The pulse oximeter noninvasively measures tissue oxygen saturation of anesthetized patients to ensure proper oxygenation and perfusion. (9) The ventilator permits operations on anesthetized patients and breathes for patients who have pulmonary crises. (10) Artificial hips, knees and other joints restore movement to those with mobility problems.

Keywords

medical devices computed tomography artificial kidney cardiac pacemaker ventilator 

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Dept. Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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