Miscellaneous social cost issues

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References

  1. 3.
    See Collins and Lapsley (2003), Eadington (2003), Grinols (2004), and Walker (2007b).Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    For example, see Grinols (2004), Grinols and Omorov (1996), and Thompson et al. (1997).Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Briggs, Goodin, and Nelson (1996) report results suggesting alcoholism and pathological gambling are independent addictions. However, as Shaffer et al. (1997, pp. 72–73) note, “the Briggs et al. study employed a unique subject sample that likely represents the tails of two special self-selected distributions; they also employ a small sample size. Taken collectively, these factors encourage us to view their results as tentative and their conclusions as uncertain.”Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Thompson et al. (1997, pp. 87–88) provide some anecdotal evidence from a survey of Gamblers Anonymous members.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    For a comprehensive discussion of the rational addiction model, see Becker (1996), a collection of his previous papers: Becker (1992), Becker and Murphy (1988), and Stigler and Becker (1977). Empirical tests of the model can be found in Chaloupka (1991) and Becker et al. (1991, 1994). Mobilia (1992) applies the model to gambling behavior.Google Scholar
  6. 12.
    The Australian Productivity Commission report (APC 1999, Appendix C) provides a detailed discussion of the CS derived from gambling.Google Scholar
  7. 18.
    See Mueller (1989, p. 231) or Johnson (1991, pp. 336, 338) for an explanation of this.Google Scholar
  8. 21.
    Papers from both conferences are published. The Whistler papers are in the Journal of Gambling Studies (2003, vol. 19). Papers from Banff are forthcoming in Williams et al. (2007).Google Scholar

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