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Food Physics pp 417–426Cite as

Acoustical Properties

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Abstract

Acoustical properties are those that govern how materials respond to sound waves, which are what we perceive as sound. We are all familiar with how a disturbance in a body of water will cause waves to develop and travel along the surface of the water in all directions away from the disturbance. Air is also a fluid and responds to a disturbance in the same way, by creating air waves that travel in all directions away from the disturbance. Just as with waves on the surface of water, these air waves are peaks and valleys of relatively high and low pressure that can be sensed as oscillations of air pressure at a given frequency. When this frequency is in the range between 16 Hz up to about 16,000 Hz (16 kHz) these oscillating air waves are sensed by the human ear as audible sound. Sound with higher frequencies is called ultrasound, and at frequencies above 109 Hz it is called hyper sound (Table 12.1).

Keywords

  • Acoustic Emission
  • Sound Pressure
  • Sound Wave
  • Sound Pressure Level
  • Acoustical Property

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2007 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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(2007). Acoustical Properties. In: Food Physics. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-34194-9_12

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