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Deciphering the Genetic Blueprint of Cerebellar Development by the Gene Expression Profiling Informatics

  • Akira Sato
  • Noriyuki Morita
  • Tetsushi Sadakata
  • Fumio Yoshikawa
  • Yoko Shiraishi-Yamaguchi
  • JinHong Huang
  • Satoshi Shoji
  • Mineko Tomomura
  • Yumi Sato
  • Emiko Suga
  • Yukiko Sekine
  • Aiko Kitamura
  • Yasuyuki Shibata
  • Teiichi Furuichi
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3316)

Abstract

The brain is the ultimate genetic system to which a large number of genes are devoted. To extract and visualize biological information from such large data sets accumulated in the post-sequencing era, the use of bioinformatics would be a very powerful means. To understand the genetic basis of mouse cerebellar postnatal development, we have analyzed the whole transcription or gene expression (transcriptome) during the developmental stages on a genome-wide basis, and have systematized the spatio-temporal gene expression profile information in a comprehensive database (Cerebellar Development Transcriptome [CDT] database) from a bioinformatics point of view. This CDT database would open up a new field for deciphering the genetic blueprint for cerebellar development.

Keywords

Genetic Blueprint Cerebellar Development Genome Sequencing Consortium Mouse Cerebellum International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Sato
    • 1
  • Noriyuki Morita
    • 1
  • Tetsushi Sadakata
    • 1
  • Fumio Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • Yoko Shiraishi-Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • JinHong Huang
    • 1
  • Satoshi Shoji
    • 1
  • Mineko Tomomura
    • 1
  • Yumi Sato
    • 1
  • Emiko Suga
    • 1
  • Yukiko Sekine
    • 1
  • Aiko Kitamura
    • 1
  • Yasuyuki Shibata
    • 1
  • Teiichi Furuichi
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Molecular NeurogenesisRIKEN Brain Science InstituteSaitamaJapan

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