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Motivating Study of Formal Methods in the Classroom

  • Joy N. Reed
  • Jane E. Sinclair
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3294)

Abstract

One challenge to Formal Methods educators is the need to motivate students both to choose our courses and to continue studying them. In this paper we consider the question of motivation from two angles. Firstly, we provide small examples designed to overcome the “mental resistance” often found in typical students studying introductory formal methods courses. The examples illustrate advantages of a formal approach, and can be appreciated by both novice and experienced programmers. The second part of the paper considers the questions of motivation more generally and raises for debate a number of relevant issues.

Keywords

Intrinsic Motivation Formal Method Lesson Learn Mathematical Nature Novice Programmer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joy N. Reed
    • 1
  • Jane E. Sinclair
    • 2
  1. 1.Armstrong Atlantic State UniversitySavannahUS
  2. 2.University of WarwickCoventryUK

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