Advertisement

Spatio-temporal Relevant Logic as the Logical Basis for Specifying, Verifying, and Reasoning About Mobile Multi-agent Systems

  • Jingde Cheng
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3289)

Abstract

To specify, verify, and reason about mobile multi-agent systems, we need a fundamental logic system to provide us with a criterion of logical validity as well as a representation and specification language. Because design and development of mobile multi-agent systems primarily concern that what decisions and how the decisions can be made by mobile agents with incomplete or even inconsistent knowledge acting concurrently in spatial regions changing over time, the fundamental logic must be able to underlie truth-preserving and relevant reasoning in the sense of conditional, ampliative reasoning, paracomplete reasoning, paraconsistent reasoning, spatial reasoning, and temporal reasoning. Since no existing logic system can satisfy the requirements, this paper proposes a new family of logic, named “spatio-temporal relevant logic,” and shows that it is a hopeful candidate for the fundamental logic we need.

Keywords

Multiagent System Mobile Agent Logic System Atomic Formula Spatial Reasoning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Anderson, A.R., Belnap Jr., N.D.: Entailment: The Logic of Relevance and Necessity, vol. I. Princeton University Press, Princeton (1975)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Anderson, A.R., Belnap Jr., N.D., Dunn, J.M.: Entailment: The Logic of Relevance and Necessity, vol. II. Princeton University Press, Princeton (1992)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Burgess, J.P.: Basic Tense Logic. In: Gabbay, D., Guenthner, F. (eds.) Handbook of Philosophical Logic, 2nd edn., vol. 7, pp. 1–42. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht (2002)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cardelli, L., Gordon, A.D.: Anytime, Anywhere: Modal Logics for Mobile Ambients. In: Proc. 27th ACM Symposium on Principles of Programming Languages, pp. 365–377. ACM Press, New York (2000)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cheng, J.: The Fundamental Role of Entailment in Knowledge Representation and Reasoning. Journal of Computing and Information, Special Issue: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of Computing and Information 2(1), 853–873 (1996)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cheng, J.: EnCal: An Automated Forward Deduction System for General-Purpose Entailment Calculus. In: Terashima, N., Altman, E. (eds.) Advanced IT Tools, Proc. IFIP World Conference on IT Tools, IFIP 96 − 14th World Computer Congress, pp. 507–514. Chapman & Hall, London (1996)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Cheng, J.: A Strong Relevant Logic Model of Epistemic Processes in Scientific Discovery. In: Kawaguchi, E., Kangassalo, H., Jaakkola, H., Hamid, I.A. (eds.) Information Modelling and Knowledge Bases XI, pp. 136–159. IOS Press, Amsterdam (2000)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Cheng, J.: Temporal Relevant Logic as the Logical Basis of Anticipatory Reasoning - Reacting Systems. In: Dubois, D.M. (ed.) Computing Anticipatory Systems: CASYS 2003 - Sixth International Conference. AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 718, American Institute of Physics, Melville (2004)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Cohn, A.G., Bennett, B., Gooday, J., Gotts, N.M.: RCC: A Calculus for Region based Qualitative Spatial Reasoning. GeoInformatica 1, 275–316 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cohn, A.G., Bennett, B., Gooday, J., Gotts, N.M.: Representing and Reasoning with Qualitative Spatial Relations About Regions. In: Stock, O. (ed.) Spatial and Temporal Reasoning, pp. 97–134. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Cohn, A.G., Hazarika, S.M.: Qualitative Spatial Representation and Reasoning: An Overview. Fundamenta Informaticae 45, 1–29 (2001)MathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Diaz, M.R.: Topics in the Logic of Relevance. Philosophia Verlag, Munchen (1981)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Dunn, J.M., Restall, G.: Relevance Logic. In: Gabbay, D., Guenthner, F. (eds.) Handbook of Philosophical Logic, 2nd edn., vol. 6, pp. 1–128. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht (2002)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Fagin, R., Halpern, J.Y., Moses, Y., Vardi, M.Y.: Reasoning About Knowledge. The MIT Press, Cambridge (1999)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Egenhofer, M.J., Golledge, R.G. (eds.): Spatial and Temporal Reasoning in Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press, New York (1998)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Mares, E.D., Meyer, R.K.: Relevant Logics. In: Goble, L. (ed.) The Blackwell Guide to Philosophical Logic, pp. 280–308. Blackwell, Oxford (2001)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Merz, S., Wirsing, M., Zappe, J.: A Spatio-Temporal Logic for the Specification and Refinement of Mobile Systems. In: Pezzé, M. (ed.) FASE 2003. LNCS, vol. 2621, pp. 87–101. Springer, Heidelberg (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Milner, R.: Communicating and Mobile Systems: the π-Calculus. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1999)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Randell, D., Cui, Z., Cohn, A.: A Spatial Logic Based on Regions and Connection. In: Proc. 3rd International Conference on Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, pp. 165–176 (1992)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Read, S.: Relevant Logic: A Philosophical Examination of Inference. Basil Blackwell, Oxford (1988)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Sangiorgi, D., Walker, D.: The Pi-calculus: A Theory of Mobile Processes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (2001)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Stock, O. (ed.): Spatial and Temporal Reasoning. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht (1997)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    van Benthem, J.: Temporal Logic. In: Gabbay, D.M., Hogger, C.J., Robinson, J.A. (eds.) Handbook of Logic in Artificial Intelligence and Logic Programming, vol. 4, pp. 241–350. Oxford University Press, Oxford (1995)Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Venema, Y.: Temporal Logic. In: Goble, L. (ed.) The Blackwell Guide to Philosophical Logic, pp. 203–223. Blackwell, Malden (2001)Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Weiss, G. (ed.): Multiagent Systems: A Modern Approach to Distributed Artificial Intelligence. The MIT Press, Cambridge (1999)Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Wooldridge, M.: Reasoning about Rational Agents. The MIT Press, Cambridge (2000)zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Wooldridge, M.: An Introduction to Multiagent Systems. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester (2002)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jingde Cheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information and Computer SciencesSaitama UniversitySaitamaJapan

Personalised recommendations