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System Design for Implementing Distributed Modular Architecture to Reliable Surgical Robotic System

  • Eisuke Aoki
  • Takashi Suzuki
  • Etsuko Kobayashi
  • Nobuhiko Hata
  • Takeyoshi Dohi
  • Makoto Hashizume
  • Ichiro Sakuma
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3217)

Abstract

A method that resolves the two competing requirements for a surgical robotic system (reliability and scalability) is discussed, along with its preliminary implementation in a master-slave system. The proposed method enables an architecture that can be scaled without impairing the performance of the surgical robotic system. Our method uses an optimized architecture consisting of two components: a common object request broker architecture (CORBA) and a master-slave system that typically operates using two-way communication links between a client and a remote server (the dedicated system architecture). In this new architecture, the surgical robotic system can maintain a reliable performance and can integrate with various systems in a transparent manner, regardless of the hardware, operating system, or programming language. Our method was evaluated by recording all the available surgical information, and shows a reliable scalability for a surgical robotic system requiring real-time operation, regardless of the condition of the components of a CORBA-based system.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eisuke Aoki
    • 1
  • Takashi Suzuki
    • 1
  • Etsuko Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Nobuhiko Hata
    • 1
  • Takeyoshi Dohi
    • 2
  • Makoto Hashizume
    • 3
  • Ichiro Sakuma
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier SciencesThe University of Tokyo 
  2. 2.Graduate School of Information Science and TechnologyThe University of Tokyo 
  3. 3.Department of Disaster and Emergency MedicineKyushu University 

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