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Computing Speech Acts

  • Gemma Bel Enguix
  • M. Dolores Jimenez Lopez
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3192)

Abstract

Human-computer interfaces require models of dialogue structure that capture the variability and unpredictability within dialogue. In this paper we propose to use a computing paradigm –membrane systems– in order to define such a dialogue model. We introduce Primary Dialogue Membrane Systems (shortly, PDMS) as a biological computing model that computes pragmatic minimal units –speech acts– for constructing dialogues. We claim that PDMS provide a simple model where the passage from the real dialogue to the membrane system model can be achieved in a highly formalized way.

Keywords

Membrane Systems Dialogue Modelling Speech Acts 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gemma Bel Enguix
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Dolores Jimenez Lopez
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Milan-BicoccaMilanItaly
  2. 2.Research Group on Mathematical LinguisticsUniversitat Rovira i VirgiliTarragonaSpain

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