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The Development of Private and State Schools in England

  • Geoffrey WalfordEmail author
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

In England, private schooling has long been associated with elitism and privilege. In a recent report for the last Labour Government (Panel on Fair Access to the Professions 2009) it was claimed that well over half of the members of the professions had attended private schooling even though only about 7% of the general population did so. Thus 75% of judges, 70% of finance directors, 45% of top civil servants and 32% of Members of Parliament were privately educated.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.OxfordEngland

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