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Human-Elephant Encounters in Music

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Part of the Cultural Animal Studies book series (CAS,volume 4)

Abstract

Elephants and human music have been related in various cultures and various historical situations. This paper mainly tries to explore some of the connections between elephants and music in Western culture and some of the encounters between elephants and humans that have been generated or furthered by Western music. What happens when elephants listen to human music? What happens when they have to perform to this music? How is the concept of being a listening subject challenged by applying it to nonhumans? These questions are discussed in connection with several historical constellations of human-elephant relationships, from the ambiguous association of elephants with music in classical Rome to the 2014 documentary Music for Elephants and recent videos of seemingly dancing zoo elephants on the internet.

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Correspondence to Martin Ullrich .

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Ullrich, M. (2019). Human-Elephant Encounters in Music. In: Böhm, A., Ullrich, J. (eds) Animal Encounters. Cultural Animal Studies, vol 4. J.B. Metzler, Stuttgart. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-476-04939-1_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-476-04939-1_18

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  • Publisher Name: J.B. Metzler, Stuttgart

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-476-04938-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-476-04939-1

  • eBook Packages: J.B. Metzler Humanities (German Language)