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Transport Proteins in Blood: A Possible Role in Hormone Disrupting Effects of Pollutants

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Bioresponse-Linked Instrumental Analysis

Part of the book series: Teubner-Reihe UMWELT ((TRU))

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Abstract

Hormone disrupting activities of pesticides and other enviromental contaminants are of great concern and many efforts have been made to develop assays for the assessment of such activities. Contaminants may affect hormonal systems at several levels. With regard to steroid and thyroid hormones it is known that there exists a delicate balance between the free and bound fraction in mammal blood, which defines the hormonal status of an organism. For this reason in the present contribution, attention is focussed on those proteins in blood that control the levels of bound and free steroid/thyroid hormones and hence there biological activities. Based on clinical studies relating to pathological conditions, the possible effects of pollutants through binding to blood proteins are explained.

Target proteins are the specific transport proteins SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin), CBG (Corticosteroid Binding Globulin) and TBG (Thyroxin Binding Globulin). With high affinity these proteins bind estrogens/androgens, corticosteroids/progesterone, and T3/T4, respectively. Based on these properties the possibilities to develop competitive assays using transport proteins as main component are discussed. Taking SHBG as an example, the results of a competitive binding assay for the assessment of the potential estrogenic/androgenic activity of various pesticides and pharmaceuticals are presented. Additionally, the effect of exogenous pollutants on metabolic, reproductive and psychological conditions in man as a result of displacement of endogenous hormones from their respective binding proteins are envisaged. Finally, future developments will be discussed, including application of binding assays in environmental and toxicological research and analysis.

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© 2001 B. G. Teubner GmbH, Stuttgart/Leipzig/Wiesbaden

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Meulenberg, E.P. (2001). Transport Proteins in Blood: A Possible Role in Hormone Disrupting Effects of Pollutants. In: Hock, B. (eds) Bioresponse-Linked Instrumental Analysis. Teubner-Reihe UMWELT. Vieweg+Teubner Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-322-86568-7_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-322-86568-7_6

  • Publisher Name: Vieweg+Teubner Verlag

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-519-00316-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-322-86568-7

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