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My Story

  • Sandy Lazarus
Chapter
Part of the Community Psychology book series (COMPSY)

Abstract

In this first chapter, I share a short story and then provide a snapshot of the storyline which will constitute a focus for my autoethnographic analysis. I then identify the four key threads emerging from this analysis and share the lenses I use when examining my experiences.

Keywords

Autoethnography Narrative South African context Community psychology practice Philosophical perspective 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandy Lazarus
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Social and Health SciencesUniversity of South Africa (Unisa)PretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC)-Unisa ViolenceInjury and Peace Research UnitCape TownSouth Africa
  3. 3.Faculty of EducationUniversity of the Western CapeCape TownSouth Africa

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