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Central Implanted Venous Access Port

Abstract

Venous port system allows for repeated accesses to the bloodstream over time, if treated with caution, up to 5 years with more than 2000 injections. Venous port is located beneath the skin and consists of a capsule commonly made of titanium with one or two injection chambers covered by a thick silicone rubber membrane which is self-sealing. The injection chamber is connected to a radiopaque catheter and should only be perforated by special venous port needles (“noncoring needles”). Training of personnel and patient/family is essential to keep the venous port over a long time. Only trained personnel should carry out the treatment and the procedure should be written and implemented.

Studies from CDC show that up to 70% of all nosocomial bloodstream infections may be prevented and that includes venous port infections. The following chapter focuses on practical measures to control and prevent bloodstream infections from implanted port for prolonged intravascular access.

Keywords

  • Venous port
  • Implantable venous access port
  • Port-a-Cath
  • InfusaPort
  • PassPort
  • Subclavian port
  • Medi-port
  • Bloodstream infection
  • BSI
  • Catheter-associated bloodstream infection
  • Infection control
  • Hygiene

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Andersen, B.M. (2019). Central Implanted Venous Access Port. In: Prevention and Control of Infections in Hospitals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99921-0_42

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99921-0_42

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