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Exercise, Opportunity, and the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

  • David HollarEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The self-fulfilling prophecy occurs when we view certain people from a biased perspective or given limited, anecdotal information, such that we continue to view their abilities based upon the false perspective and despite the individual’s motivation and actual performance. Its occurrence is widespread throughout organizations and social institutions, potentially negatively impacting the life chances of millions of people living with disabilities. The situation persists despite considerable legislation intended to benefit this population, with unemployment rates consistently approaching 80% with little change over the past four decades in the United States. These conditions further translate into poverty, poor health behaviors, and lack of exercise, further contributing to additional, secondary conditions. Some efforts are being made to improve access and exercise options of people with disabilities, but the real change needed to drive overall systems improvements for disability inclusion in all aspects of life remains a daunting task.

Abbreviations

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act

CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

DHDS

Disability and Health Data System (CDC)

ICF

International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

IEP

Individualized Education Plan

NCHPAD

National Center on Health, Physical Activity, and Disability

NIDILRR

National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research

UD

Universal Design

UDE

Universal Design for Exercise

UDL

Universal Design for Learning

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Health AdministrationPfeiffer UniversityMisenheimerUSA

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