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Depression and Chronic Medical Illness: New Treatment Approaches

  • Trina E. ChangEmail author
  • Sean D. Boyden
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Psychiatry book series (CCPSY)

Abstract

When depression co-occurs with a chronic medical condition, it can have negative effects on both mental and physical health: Depression can lead to worsened treatment adherence and outcomes for the medical condition, while the medical condition may contribute to increased distress and depression. In addition, the combination causes problems for the larger health-care system as a whole by increasing health-care utilization and costs. As a result, researchers, providers and policymakers have turned their attention to treating depression comorbid with medical illnesses. For example, some individual-level interventions involve utilizing psychotherapy techniques to promote behavior change and better disease management while also addressing the depressive symptoms; others identify common treatment components such as encouraging physical activity. On a broader level, some interventions entail system-wide change to implement disease management models that can manage the comorbid conditions. In this chapter, we describe several emerging treatment approaches utilizing psychotherapeutic or population health approaches for this population.

Keywords

Depression Chronic medical conditions Comorbidities Medical morbidity and mortality in psychiatric patients Collaborative care Behavioral health Adherence Population health management Diabetes Cardiovascular disease Obesity Cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes And Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number K23DK097356. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Depression Clinical and Research Program, Department of PsychiatryMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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