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Category IV: Neoplasm—Undetermined Malignant Potential

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Abstract

Neoplasms of low malignant potential represent a group of rare tumors of diverse differentiation that behave mostly in a benign fashion but have unpredictable capacity to recur locally or at distant sites. The majority of these tumors can occur in other sites of the body but can present as incidentally discovered pulmonary masses mimicking pulmonary malignant tumors. Patients are often asymptomatic. Aspiration biopsy or small biopsies are necessary to rule out malignancy. Therefore it is important for cytopathologists and cytotechnologists to be familiar with the cytological features of these rare neoplasms and their diagnostic pitfalls.

Keywords

Low malignant potential—borderline Sclerosing pneumocytoma Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor Myoepithelial tumor Pulmonary meningioma Sugar tumor Solitary fibrous tumor Langhans cells histiocytosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyNew York University Langone HealthNew YorkUSA

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