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Introduction: Face to Face—Locating Classical Receptions on Screen

  • Anastasia BakogianniEmail author
  • Ricardo Apostol
Chapter
Part of the The New Antiquity book series (NANT)

Abstract

Not all works enter into conversation with the Classics in a straightforward manner. Part I of this volume, ‘Beyond Fidelity’, examines works that lay claim to an identifiable ancient source text but whose reception is sufficiently fuzzy, idiosyncratic, or impure to place the relationship between the two in question. Part II, ‘Beyond Influence’, takes up works that claim descent from diffuse notions of the ancient world, rather than specific texts, and asks whether it is not the modern work that is in fact the creator of its sources. The final part, ‘Beyond Original’, uses case studies from modern media to radically call into question the necessity for hierarchical metaphors of classical original/modern epigone, and instead explores alternative formulations such as comparison and juxtaposition.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Our sincere thanks to Marta García Morcillo for reading and commenting on this introduction.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Massey UniversityAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.George SchoolNewtownUSA

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