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Lying Online: Examining the Production, Detection, and Popular Beliefs Surrounding Interpersonal Deception in Technologically-Mediated Environments

Abstract

Communication technologies, such as texting, social network sites (SNSs), and online dating, raise questions about how interpersonal deception plays out in communication environments that differ from face-to-face. This chapter provides a state-of-the-art review of (1) online deception production, or how much people lie online; (2) popular beliefs about online deception, or how much deception people think occurs online; and (3) online deception detection, or how accurate deception detection tends to be in online environments, and what cues are diagnostic of deception. We pay particular attention to the link between technological affordances and deception, proposing that communication technologies contain deception enablers, or affordances that facilitate deception (e.g., editability, reduced nonverbal cues) and deception constraints, or affordances that minimize deception (e.g., recordability, the presence of an audience).

Keywords

  • Interpersonal deception
  • Online deception production
  • Online deception detection
  • Popular beliefs about online deception
  • Communication technology
  • Media affordances
  • Deception enablers
  • Deception constraints

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Correspondence to Catalina L. Toma .

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Toma, C.L., Bonus, J.A., Van Swol, L.M. (2019). Lying Online: Examining the Production, Detection, and Popular Beliefs Surrounding Interpersonal Deception in Technologically-Mediated Environments. In: Docan-Morgan, T. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Deceptive Communication . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-96334-1_31

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