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True and False Intentions: A Science of Lies About the Future

  • Eric Mac GiollaEmail author
  • Pär Anders Granhag
Chapter
  • 873 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the bourgeoning field of true and false intentions. A statement of true intent refers to a future action which a speaker intends to carry out, while a statement of false intent refers to a future action which a speaker claims, but does not intend to carry out. An ability to distinguish between such statements holds great practical value for a myriad of professions. Despite this practical value, the topic of true and false intentions has largely been ignored by researchers, who typically focus on judging the veracity of statements concerning past events. The chapter defines key terms in the field, summarizes the extant research, and highlights recent theoretical developments and areas for future research.

Keywords

True and false intentions Deception Future thought Goals Planning 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  2. 2.Norwegian Police University CollegeOsloNorway

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