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Trade-Offs and Synergies Between Biodiversity Conservation and Productivity in the Context of Increasing Demands on Landscapes

  • Ralf SeppeltEmail author
  • Michael Beckmann
  • Silvia Ceauşu
  • Anna F. Cord
  • Katharina Gerstner
  • Jessica Gurevitch
  • Stephan Kambach
  • Stefan Klotz
  • Chase Mendenhall
  • Helen R. P. Phillips
  • Kristin Powell
  • Peter H. Verburg
  • Willem Verhagen
  • Marten Winter
  • Tim Newbold
Chapter

Abstract

A growing human population coupled with increasing per capita consumption, changing diets, increasing food waste, and ineffective regulation, have led to rising demands on ecosystems for the services they supply [1].

Keywords

Concept Trade-offs Synergies Agricultural production Biodiversity conservation Land-use intensity Landscape configuration Landscape composition 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralf Seppelt
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Michael Beckmann
    • 1
  • Silvia Ceauşu
    • 3
  • Anna F. Cord
    • 1
  • Katharina Gerstner
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jessica Gurevitch
    • 4
  • Stephan Kambach
    • 5
  • Stefan Klotz
    • 5
  • Chase Mendenhall
    • 6
  • Helen R. P. Phillips
    • 7
  • Kristin Powell
    • 8
  • Peter H. Verburg
    • 9
  • Willem Verhagen
    • 10
  • Marten Winter
    • 3
  • Tim Newbold
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Computational Landscape EcologyHelmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZLeipzigGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Geoscience and Geography, Martin Luther University Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  3. 3.German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-LeipzigLeipzigGermany
  4. 4.Department of Ecology and EvolutionStony Brook UniversityStony BrookUSA
  5. 5.Department of Community EcologyHelmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZHalleGermany
  6. 6.Center for Conservation Biology, Department of BiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  7. 7.Department of Life SciencesImperial College LondonLondonUK
  8. 8.National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC)AnnapolisUSA
  9. 9.Department of Earth Sciences, Institute for Environmental StudiesVU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  10. 10.PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment AgencyThe HagueThe Netherlands
  11. 11.Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, Centre for Biodiversity and Environment ResearchUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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