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Abstract

Measuring outcomes is becoming an increasingly standard part of practice in education, healthcare, and social services for persons with intellectual disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorders. A good understanding of approaches to outcome measurement is particularly useful for mental health professionals for the increasing needs to advocate on behalf of their patients, follow a multidimensional approach, promote good quality services, and facilitate research. The present chapter outlines the evolution of concepts, use, research, and policy for outcome measurement in reference to mental healthcare for persons with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder.

A considerable portion of this chapter is dedicated to community inclusion, which represents a key outcome in this field. There are many outcomes and benefits to both physical and social inclusion, comprising health and emotional benefits. These outcomes have been demonstrated in schools, workplaces, faith communities, and community organizations and include benefits for both people with disabilities and members of the general population. Ways to measure inclusion itself have been challenging, since the definition and components of it have varied across models.

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Bertelli, M.O., Amado, A.N., Bianco, A. (2022). Outcome Measures and Inclusion. In: Bertelli, M.O., Deb, S.(., Munir, K., Hassiotis, A., Salvador-Carulla, L. (eds) Textbook of Psychiatry for Intellectual Disability and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95720-3_14

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