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Divergent and Convergent Collaborative Creativity

  • Paul B. PaulusEmail author
  • Lauren E. Coursey
  • Jared B. Kenworthy
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture book series (PASCC)

Abstract

Past research examining group creativity has focused almost exclusively on the divergent process of ideation. However, we recognize that group innovation is also dependent upon convergent processes such as idea selection and implementation. In the present chapter we review the existing theory and research relevant to both the divergent and convergent processes of effective group innovation. We place particular focus on the ways in which facilitating conditions may impact each innovation phase (divergent and convergent), whether similarly or uniquely. Finally, we present a theoretical model in which we propose various intervening factors that may link productive group ideation to optimal idea selection and implementation.

Keywords

Divergent creativity Convergent creativity Collaborative innovation Brainstorming Diversity Group decisions Individual differences Group affect Synchrony Elaboration 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The preparation of this chapter was supported by collaborative grant INSPIRE BCS 1247971 to the first and third authors from the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul B. Paulus
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lauren E. Coursey
    • 1
  • Jared B. Kenworthy
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TexasArlingtonUSA

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