Advertisement

Basis of Design

  • Ioannis VayasEmail author
  • John Ermopoulos
  • George Ioannidis
Chapter
Part of the Springer Tracts in Civil Engineering book series (SPRTRCIENG)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the objectives of steel structures and their main fields of application that include almost all types of works in the construction sector, listing the most important advantages for the basic material in terms of mechanical properties, the high prefabrication, the easiness of connection between elements, but also the “after construction” benefits, like recyclability, durability, or easiness for strengthening and repair. It makes reference to the Eurocodes and other specifications on which this book is based and more specifically to the parts and structure of Eurocode 3 that specifies the design of steel structures. It then gives the main types of actions and provides information on the determination of the most important ones for building structures like imposed loads, wind, snow, temperature or earthquake. The ultimate and serviceability limit states are defined and the combinations of actions, together with the relevant partial safety and combination factors. Finally, the main mechanical properties of steel and the structural steel grades are presented, with some basic information on the microstructure of steel and common steel making processes that help understand the source of attaining the specified mechanical, physical and chemical properties.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1.1] Homer OdysseyGoogle Scholar
  2. [1.2] Kurrer K–E (2017) Georg Christoph Mehrtens (1843–1917): protagonist of steel bridge–building in Kaiser Wilhelm’s Germany. Stahlbau 86:527–547CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [1.3] EN 1990 (2002) Basis of structural design. CENGoogle Scholar
  4. [1.4] EN 1991(2002) Actions on structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  5. [1.5] EN 1992 (2002) Design of concrete structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  6. [1.6] EN 1993 (2002) Design of steel structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  7. [1.7] EN 1994 (2004) Design of composite steel and concrete structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  8. [1.8] EN 1995 (2004) Design of timber structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  9. [1.9] EN 1996 (2003) Design of masonry structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  10. [1.10] EN 1997 (2004) Geotechnical design. CENGoogle Scholar
  11. [1.11] EN 1998 (2004) Design of structures for earthquake resistance. CENGoogle Scholar
  12. [1.12] EN 1995 (2008) Design of aluminium structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  13. [1.13] EN 1993–1–1 (2005) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–1: General rules and rules for buildings. CENGoogle Scholar
  14. [1.14] EN 1993–1–2 (2004) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–2: General rules. Structural fire design. CENGoogle Scholar
  15. [1.15] EN 1993–1–3 (2005) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–3: General rules. Supplementary rules for cold–formed thin gauge members and sheeting. CENGoogle Scholar
  16. [1.16] EN 1993–1–4 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–4: General rules. Supplementary rules for Stainless steels. CENGoogle Scholar
  17. [1.17] EN 1993–1–5 (2006): Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–5: Plated structural elements. CENGoogle Scholar
  18. [1.18] EN 1993–1–6 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–6: Strength and Stability of Shell Structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  19. [1.19] EN 1993–1–7 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–7: Strength and stability of planar plated structures subjected to out of plane loading. CENGoogle Scholar
  20. [1.20] EN 1993–1–8 (2005) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–8: Design of joints. CENGoogle Scholar
  21. [1.21] EN 1993–1–9 (2005) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–9: Fatigue. CENGoogle Scholar
  22. [1.22] EN 1993–1–10 (2005) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–10: Selection of materials for fracture toughness and through–thickness properties. CENGoogle Scholar
  23. [1.23] EN 1993–1–11 (2003) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–11: Design of structures with tension components. CENGoogle Scholar
  24. [1.24] EN 1993–1–12 (2007) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 1–12: Additional rules for the extension of EN 1993 up to steel grades S 700. CENGoogle Scholar
  25. [1.25] EN 1993–2 (2004) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 2: Steel Bridges. CENGoogle Scholar
  26. [1.26] EN 1993–3–1 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 3–1: Towers, masts and chimneys – Towers and masts. CENGoogle Scholar
  27. [1.27] EN 1993–3–2 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 3–2: Towers, masts and chimneys – Chimneys. CENGoogle Scholar
  28. [1.28] EN 1993–4–1 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 4–1: Silos. CENGoogle Scholar
  29. [1.29] EN 1993–4–2 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 4–2: Tanks. CEN [1.30] EN 1993–4–3 (2006): Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 4–3: Pipelines. CENGoogle Scholar
  30. [1.30] EN 1993–4–3 (2006): Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 4–3: Pipelines. CENGoogle Scholar
  31. [1.31] EN 1993–5 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 5: Piling. CENGoogle Scholar
  32. [1.32] EN 1993–6 (2006) Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures – Part 6: Crane supporting structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  33. [1.33] EN 1090–2 (2008) Execution of steel structures and aluminium structures. CENGoogle Scholar
  34. [1.34] EN 1991–1–1 (2002) Eurocode 1: Actions on structures – Part 1–1: General actions – Densities, self–weight, imposed loads for buildings. CENGoogle Scholar
  35. [1.35] EN 1991–1–3 (2003) Eurocode 1: Actions on structures – Part 1–3: General actions – Snow loads. CENGoogle Scholar
  36. [1.36] EN 1991–1–4 (2004) Eurocode 1: Actions on structures – Part 1–4: General actions – Wind actions. CENGoogle Scholar
  37. [1.37] EN 1991–1–5 (2003) Eurocode 1: Actions on structures – Part 1–5: General actions – Thermal actions. CENGoogle Scholar
  38. [1.38] EN 1991–1–7 (2005) Eurocode 1: Actions on structures – Part 1–7: General actions – Accidental actions. CENGoogle Scholar
  39. [1.39] Izzuddin BA, Vlassis AG, Elghazouli AY, Nethercot DA (2008) Progressive collapse of multi–storey buildings due to sudden column–loss–Part I Simplified assessment framework, Engineering Structures. 30(5): 1308–1318CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. [1.40] GSA Guidelines for progressive collapse analysis (2003) US General Services AdministrationGoogle Scholar
  41. [1.41] EN 1998–1 (2004) Eurocode 8: Design of structures for earthquake resistance – Part 1: General rules, seismic actions and rules for buildings. CENGoogle Scholar
  42. [1.42] Rollason EC (1987) Metallurgy for Engineers. Butterworth–Heinemann LtdGoogle Scholar
  43. [1.43] Bhadeshia H, Honeycombe R (2017) Steels: Microstructure and properties 4th ed. Butterworth–Heinemann LtdGoogle Scholar
  44. [1.44] EN ISO 6892 Metallic materials – Tensile testing. Parts 1,2,3 for testing at room, elevated and low temperature. CENGoogle Scholar
  45. [1.45] EN 10164 (2004) Steel products with improved deformation properties perpendicular to the surface of the product – Technical delivery conditions. CENGoogle Scholar
  46. [1.46]Volz M, Schröter F, Steidl G (2008) Structural Steels in structural engineering. Stahlbau 77(11): 781–790 (in German)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. [1.47] EN 10027 (2005) Designation systems for steel – Part 1: steel names. CENGoogle Scholar
  48. [1.48] EN 10025 (2004) Hot rolled products of structural steels. CENGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ioannis Vayas
    • 1
    Email author
  • John Ermopoulos
    • 2
  • George Ioannidis
    • 2
  1. 1.Civil EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.National Technical University of AthensAthensGreece

Personalised recommendations