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Do Vaccines Cause Spontaneous Abortion?

Abstract

Vaccines currently routinely recommended for pregnant women in the U.S. have not been shown to cause spontaneous abortion (SAb). Although one study has suggested a possible increase in risk of SAb early in pregnancy following inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV), other studies have not found an association and the results are not conclusive.

Keywords

  • Vaccine
  • Vaccines
  • Vaccinate
  • Vaccination
  • Vaccinations
  • Immunize
  • Immunization
  • Immunizations
  • United States
  • Information
  • Summary
  • Summaries
  • Safety
  • Adverse event
  • Adverse events
  • Adverse effect
  • Adverse effects
  • Association
  • Evidence
  • Causality
  • Spontaneous abortion
  • Miscarriage
  • Influenza
  • IIV

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Dudley, M.Z. et al. (2018). Do Vaccines Cause Spontaneous Abortion?. In: The Clinician’s Vaccine Safety Resource Guide. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94694-8_54

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94694-8_54

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