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Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?

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Abstract

Vaccines currently routinely recommended to the general population in the U.S. do not cause diabetes.

Keywords

  • Vaccine
  • Vaccines
  • Vaccinate
  • Vaccination
  • Vaccinations
  • Immunize
  • Immunization
  • Immunizations
  • United States
  • Information
  • Summary
  • Summaries
  • Safety
  • Adverse event
  • Adverse events
  • Adverse effect
  • Adverse effects
  • Association
  • Evidence
  • Causality
  • Diabetes

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Notes

  1. 1.

    These conclusions do not necessarily consider vaccines recommended only for special populations in the United States such as Yellow Fever vaccine (international travelers) or Smallpox vaccine (military personnel).

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Dudley, M.Z. et al. (2018). Do Vaccines Cause Diabetes?. In: The Clinician’s Vaccine Safety Resource Guide. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94694-8_32

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94694-8_32

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