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Strengthening Environmental Health Literacy Through Precollege STEM and Environmental Health Education

Abstract

High quality science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education provides a strong foundation for developing the environmental health literacy of students in grades pre-Kindergarten through 12 (pK-12). STEM learning inside and out of school develops the critical thinking, communications and numeracy skills, along with deep knowledge of systems and processes, that are necessary for the informed evaluation and use of environmental health information in everyday life.

Keywords

  • Problem-based learning
  • STEM education
  • Environmental health education
  • Teaching
  • Teacher
  • Curriculum
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Precollege
  • Afterschool
  • Grades K–12

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Correspondence to Nancy P. Moreno .

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Moreno, N.P. (2019). Strengthening Environmental Health Literacy Through Precollege STEM and Environmental Health Education. In: Finn, S., O'Fallon, L. (eds) Environmental Health Literacy. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94108-0_7

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