Skip to main content

Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials

Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC,volume 786)

Abstract

To ensure transferability of driving simulator-based user trials (where motion sickness onset is likely) it is important to understand if motion sickness affects human performance and therefore user trial data validity. 51 participants had their task performance ability measured in six defined categories (including physical, cognitive, visual and the intersections of each) both before and after a driving simulator exposure. Their motion sickness state was compared to their change in task completion scores across the six areas. Findings revealed that motion sickness had a significant effect on cognitive performance, physical performance, physical-visual performance and physical-cognitive performance. There was no gender effect on motion sickness severity, but it did affect participant dropout, where female nausea was a significant effector. Age had no effect on motion sickness onset and other findings are also discussed. Conclusions from this research aid in the understanding of simulator-based user trial data validity.

Keywords

  • Human factors
  • Motion sickness
  • Comfort-safety
  • Vehicle simulator
  • Human performance

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_40
  • Chapter length: 13 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   229.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-93885-1
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   299.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 1.

References

  1. Reason, J.T., Brand, J.J.: Motion Sickness. Academic Press, New York (1975)

    Google Scholar 

  2. Warwick-Evans, L.A., Symons, N., Fitch, T., Burrows, L.: Evaluating sensory conflict and postural instability. Theories of motion sickness. Brain Res. Bull. 47(5), 465–469 (1998)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  3. Stoffregen, T.A., Hettinger, L.J., Hass, M.W., Roe, M.M., Smart, L.J.: Postrual instability and motion sickness in a fixed base flight simulator. Hum. Fact. J. Hum. Fact. Ergon. Soc. 42(3), 458–469 (2000)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  4. Stoffergen, T.A., Smart Jr., L.J.: Postural instability precedes motion sickness. Brain Res. Bull. 47(5), 437–448 (1998)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  5. Balk, S.A., Bertola, M.A., Inman, V.W.: Simulator sickness questionnaire: twenty years later. In: Driving Assessment Conference (2013)

    Google Scholar 

  6. Bos, J.E.: How motions make people sick such that they perform less: a model based approach. In: Symposium on Habitability of Compact and Transport Sehicles: Noise Vibration and Motion, Prague, Czech Republic (2004)

    Google Scholar 

  7. Stroud, K.J., Harm, D.L., Klaus, D.M.: Preflight virtual reality training as a countermeasure for space motion sickness and disorientation. Aviat. Space Environ. Med. 76(4), 352–356 (2005)

    Google Scholar 

  8. Lampton, D.R., Kraemer, R.E., Kolasinski, E.M., Knerr, B.W.: An investigation of simulator sickness in a tank driver trainer (1995)

    Google Scholar 

  9. Stanney, K.M., Kennedy, R.S., Drexler, J.M., Harm, D.L.: Motion sickness and proprioceptive aftereffects following. Appl. Ergon. 30, 27–38 (1999)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  10. Raad, J.: Rehab measures: jebsen hand function test, 17 August 2012. http://www.rehabmeasures.org/Lists/RehabMeasures/DispForm.aspx?ID=1025. Accessed 03 Oct 2016

  11. Kane, M.J., Conway, A.R., Miura, T.K., Coleflesh, G.J.: Working memory, attention control, and the N-back task: a question of construct validity. J. Exp. Psychol. Learn. Mem. Cogn. 33(3), 615–622 (2007)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  12. Peters, M., Laeng, B., Latham, K., Jackson, M., Zaiyouna, R., Richardson, C.: A redrawn vandenberg and kuse mental rotations test: differnt version and factors that affect performance. Brain Cogn. 28, 39–58 (1995)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  13. Radd, J.: Rehab measures: Perdue Pegboard Test, 28 August 2014. http://www.rehabmeasures.org/Lists/RehabMeasures/DispForm.aspx?ID=1144. Accessed 03 Oct 2016

  14. Kennedy, R.S., Lane, N.E., Berbaum, S., Lilienthal, M.G.: Simulator sickness questionnaire: an enhanced method for quantifying simulator sickness. Int. J. Aviat. Psychol. 3, 203–220 (1993)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  15. The University of Warwick, WMG, “Drive-in, Driver-in-the-loop, multi-axis driving simulator (3xD),” 12 September 2016. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/wmg/research/naic/facilities/. Accessed 20 Feb 2018

  16. Keshavarz, B., Hecht, H.: Validating an efficient method to quantify motion sickness. Hum. Fact. J. Hum. Fact. Ergon. Soc. 53, 415–426 (2011)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  17. Dov, E., Yaakov, Z.: Seasickness as a self-fulfilling prophecy: raising self-efficacy to boost performance at sea. J. Appl. Psychol. 80(5), 628–635 (1995)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  18. Schouten, B., Troje, N.F., Brooks, A., Van Der Zwan, R., Verfaillie, K.: The facing bias in biological motion perception: effects of stimulus gender and observer sex. Atten. Percept. Psychophys. 72(5), 1256–1260 (2010)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  19. Collins, D.W., Kimura, D.: A large sex difference on a two-dimensional mental rotation task. Behav. Neurosci. 111(4), 845–849 (1997)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  20. Golding, J.F.: Motion sickness suceptibility. Auton. Neurosci. 129(1–2), 67–76 (2006)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  21. Turner, M.: Motion sickness in public road transport: passenger behaviour and susceptibility. Ergonomics 42(3), 444–461 (1999)

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Joseph Smyth .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2019 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature

About this paper

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this paper

Smyth, J., Birrell, S., Mouzakitis, A., Jennings, P. (2019). Motion Sickness and Human Performance – Exploring the Impact of Driving Simulator User Trials. In: Stanton, N. (eds) Advances in Human Aspects of Transportation. AHFE 2018. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol 786. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_40

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93885-1_40

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-93884-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-93885-1

  • eBook Packages: EngineeringEngineering (R0)