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3D Printing and Adenosine Receptor Activation for Craniomaxillofacial Regeneration

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Abstract

The evolution of maxillofacial reconstruction has led to advancements in patient-specific treatment plans. While the fusion of craniomaxillofacial and microvascular principles has given rise to reconstructive tools capable of approaching normalcy, limitations persist. Although the promise of bone tissue engineering has yet to be realized, promising translational developments have been reported. This chapter summarizes our group’s recent advances in materials science and 3D printing, bioactive molecule osteogenic stimulation, and their integration toward the development of devices capable of maxillofacial bony restoration.

Keywords

3D printing Bio-ceramic scaffolds Calcium phosphate biomaterials Adenosine receptors Dipyridamole 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to wholeheartedly thank Dr. Joseph G. McCarthy for his endorsement of our work and contributions to this chapter. His insight on advances and setbacks in craniomaxillofacial surgery over the last quarter of a century provides us with the unique opportunity to focus on clinically relevant challenges that have challenged reconstructive surgeons for decades.

The work presented in this chapter was supported by NIH/NIAMS 5R01AR068593-02, 3R01AR068593-02S1, 5R01AR068593-03, & 3R01AR068593-03S1, NIH/NICHD R21HD090664-01, and DoD W81XWH-16-1-0772. Drs. Coelho and Cronstein are co-inventors of the 3D printing technology presented in this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic SurgeryNYU Langone HealthNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomaterials and BiomimeticsNYU College of DentistryNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineNYU Langone HealthNew YorkUSA

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