Advertisement

The Organization and Provision of Public Services

  • Andreas LadnerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Governance and Public Management book series (GPM)

Abstract

This chapter discusses how the provision of tasks and services is organized in Switzerland. Starting historically only with military expenditures and subsidies for cantonal projects, the federal level subsequently expanded into policies such as infrastructure and transportation projects, as well as guiding the expansion of the welfare state. More recently, federal decision-makers and administrators have engaged in economic and environmental policy-making. Subsidiarity and fiscal equivalence are the guiding principles when it comes to allocating tasks to the three levels of government. Nevertheless, there is a high degree of cooperation between these levels, as well as among the cantons and the communities, or between the state and the private sector. Increasing governmental responsibilities and the importance of the various actors in fulfilling tasks is mirrored in their finances and financing modes. This is all the more significant because each level in Switzerland has its own sources of income and must pay for its own expenditures.

Keywords

Provision of tasks and services Subsidiarity Fiscal equivalence Cooperation Government revenues and expenditures Tax 

References

  1. Anderson, G. (2010). Fiscal federalism: A comparative introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bochsler, D. (2009). Neighbours or friends? When Swiss cantonal governments co-operate with each other. Regional & Federal Studies, 19(3), 349–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bochsler, D., & Sciarini, P. (2006). Konkordate und Regierungskonferenzen. Standbeine des horizontalen Föderalismus. LeGes, 17(1), 23–41.Google Scholar
  4. Buser, D. (2011). Kantonales Staatsrecht. Eine Einführung für Studium und Praxis. Basel: Helbing & Lichtenhahn.Google Scholar
  5. Guex, S. (1998). L’argent de l’Etat – Parcours des finances publiques au XXème siècle. Lausanne: réalités sociales.Google Scholar
  6. Hablützel, P. (2013). Bürokratie – Management – Governance: Schweizer Verwaltungsführung im Wandel. In A. Ladner, J.-L. Chappelet, Y. Emery, P. Knoepfel, L. Mader, N. Soguel, & F. Varone (Eds.), Handbuch der öffentlichen Verwaltung in der Schweiz (pp. 93–108). Zürich: Neue Zürcher Zeitung libro.Google Scholar
  7. Halbeisen, P. (2010). Öffentlicher Haushalt. Historisches Lexikon der Schweiz. http://www.hls-dhs-dss.ch/textes/d/D26197.php. Accessed 7 May 2012.
  8. Iff, A., Sager, F., Herrmann, E., & Wirz, R. (2010). Interkantonale und interkommunale Zusammenarbeit. Defizite bezüglich parlamentarischer und direktdemokratischer Mitwirkung (unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des Kantons Bern). Bern: KPM Verlag.Google Scholar
  9. Kersbergen, K., & Waarden, F. (2004). ‘Governance’ as a bridge between disciplines: Cross-disciplinary inspiration regarding shifts in governance and problems of governability, accountability and legitimacy. European Journal of Political Research, 43(2), 143–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ladner, A. (2010). Intergovernmental relations in Switzerland: Towards a new concept for allocating tasks and balancing differences. In M. J. Goldsmith & E. C. Page (Eds.), Changing government relations in Europe: From localism to intergovernmentalism (pp. 210–227). London: Routledge/ECPR Studies in European Political Science.Google Scholar
  11. Ladner, A. (2013). Der Schweizer Staat, politisches System und Aufgabenerbringung. In A. Ladner, J.-L. Chappelet, Y. Emery, P. Knoepfel, L. Mader, N. Soguel, & F. Varone (Eds.), Handbuch der öffentlichen Verwaltung in der Schweiz (pp. 23–46). Zürich: Neue Zürcher Zeitung libro.Google Scholar
  12. Ladner, A., Keuffer, N., & Baldersheim, H. (2016). Measuring local autonomy in 39 countries (1990–2014). Regional & Federal Studies, 26(3), 321–357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Linder, W. (1983). Entwicklung, Strukturen und Funktionen des Wirtschafts- und Sozialstaats in der Schweiz. In A. Riklin (Ed.), Handbuch des politischen Systems der Schweiz, Band 1. Grundlagen (pp. 255–381). Bern: Haupt.Google Scholar
  14. Maissen, T. (2010). Die Geschichte der Schweiz. Baden: hier + jetzt.Google Scholar
  15. Meister, U., & Rühli, L. (2009). Kantone als Konzerne. Zürich: Avenir Suisse. https://www.avenir-suisse.ch/publication/kantone-als-konzerne/. Accessed 31 May 2018.
  16. OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). (2011). Government at a glance 2011. Paris: OECD Publishing.Google Scholar
  17. Pasquier, M., & Fivat, E. (2013). Die autonomen öffentlichen Organisationen oder Agencies. In A. Ladner, J.-L. Chappelet, Y. Emery, P. Knoepfel, L. Mader, N. Soguel, & F. Varone (Eds.), Handbuch der öffentlichen Verwaltung in der Schweiz (pp. 183–198). Zürich: Neue Zürcher Zeitung libro.Google Scholar
  18. Stalder, H. (2010). Öffentlicher Haushalt. Historisches Lexikon der Schweiz. http://www.hls-dhs-dss.ch/textes/d/D26197.php. Accessed 7 May 2012.
  19. Steiner, R. (2002). Interkommunale Zusammenarbeit und Gemeindezusammenschlüsse in der Schweiz. Bern: Haupt.Google Scholar
  20. Steiner, R., & Kaiser, C. (2013). Die Gemeindeverwaltungen. In A. Ladner, J.-L. Chappelet, Y. Emery, P. Knoepfel, L. Mader, N. Soguel, & F. Varone (Eds.), Handbuch der öffentlichen Verwaltung in der Schweiz (pp. 149–166). Zürich: Neue Zürcher Zeitung libro.Google Scholar
  21. Vatter, A. (2006). Die Kantone. In U. Klöti, P. Knoepfel, H. Kriesi, W. Linder, Y. Papadopoulos, & P. Sciarini (Eds.), Handbuch der Schweizer Politik, 4th completely revised edition (pp. 203–232). Zürich: Neue Zürcher Zeitung libro.Google Scholar
  22. Vatter, A. (2016). Das politische System der Schweiz. Baden-Baden: Nomos UTB.Google Scholar
  23. Waldmann, B., & Spiess, A. (2015). Aufgaben- und Kompetenzverteilung im schweizerischen Bundesstaat. Typologie der Aufgaben und Kompetenzen von Bund und Kantonen. Institut für Föderalismus. Gutachten im Auftrag der Konferenz der Kantonsregierungen (KdK).Google Scholar
  24. Weber, M. (1969). Geschichte der schweizerischen Bundesfinanzen. Bern: Haupt.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.IDHEAPUniversity of LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations