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Chunks in Multiparty Conversation—Building Blocks for Extended Social Talk

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE,volume 510)

Abstract

Building applications which can form a longer term social bond with a user or engage with a group of users calls for knowledge of how longer conversations work. This paper describes preliminary explorations of the structure of long (c. one hour) multiparty casual conversations, focusing on a binary distinction between two types of interaction phases—chat and chunk. A collection of long form conversations which provide the data for our explorations is described. The main result is that chat and chunk segments show differences in the distribution of their duration.

Keywords

  • Multiparty conversation
  • Turntaking
  • Dialog systems

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Acknowledgements

This work is supported by the European Coordinated Research on Long-term Challenges in Information and Communication Sciences and Technologies ERA-NET (CHISTERA) JOKER project, JOKe and Empathy of a Robot/ECA: Towards social and affective relations with a robot, and by the Speech Communication Lab, Trinity College Dublin.

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Correspondence to Emer Gilmartin .

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Gilmartin, E., Cowan, B.R., Vogel, C., Campbell, N. (2019). Chunks in Multiparty Conversation—Building Blocks for Extended Social Talk. In: Eskenazi, M., Devillers, L., Mariani, J. (eds) Advanced Social Interaction with Agents . Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering, vol 510. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-92108-2_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-92108-2_4

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