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Aesthetics: Ways of Thinking Differently

  • Fiona Bannon
Chapter

Abstract

The discussion considers debates that address what we can understand of the idea of aesthetic experience. In the process, associations are drawn between aesthetics and ethics with the aim of establishing an accessible understanding of aesthetic experience as something that is fully corporeal. In appreciating aesthetic experience from this perspective, we embrace it as a constitutive feature of our sensory and cognitive selves, for it is through the very intermingled nature of our sensory and cognitive modalities that we are able to recognise experience and attain knowledge. It is here that we can come to appreciate the aesthetic and ethic as an intertwining of our sensory awareness and our perceptual experience.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fiona Bannon
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeedsLeedsUK

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