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Towards Executable Representations of Social Machines

  • Dave Murray-RustEmail author
  • Alan Davoust
  • Petros Papapanagiotou
  • Areti Manataki
  • Max Van Kleek
  • Nigel Shadbolt
  • Dave Robertson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10871)

Abstract

Human interaction is increasingly mediated through technological systems, resulting in the emergence of a new class of socio-technical systems, often called Social Machines. However, many systems are designed and managed in a centralised way, limiting the participants’ autonomy and ability to shape the systems they are part of.

In this paper we are concerned with creating a graphical formalism that allows novice users to simply draw the patterns of interaction that they desire, and have computational infrastructure assemble around the diagram. Our work includes a series of participatory design workshops, that help to understand the levels and types of abstraction that the general public are comfortable with when designing socio-technical systems. These design studies lead to a novel formalism that allows us to compose rich interaction protocols into functioning, executable architecture. We demonstrate this by translating one of the designs produced by workshop participants into an a running agent institution using the Lightweight Social Calculus (LSC).

Keywords

Social machines Diagrammatic interface Rapid assembly Prototyping 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.University of OxfordOxfordUK

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