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Synchronized Oscillations of Arterial Oxygen Saturation, Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation and Heart Rate in Preterm Neonates: Investigation of Long-Term Measurements with Multiple Einstein’s Cross Wavelet Analysis

  • Felix Scholkmann
  • Graciela Velasco Herrera
  • Tanja Karen
  • Helene Isler
  • Daniel Ostojic
  • Victor Manuel Velasco Herrera
  • Ursula Wolf
  • Martin Wolf
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1072)

Abstract

Background: In preterm neonates, the cardiovascular and cerebral vascular control is immature, making the brain vulnerable to an increased incidence of hypoxic and hyperoxic episodes. Aim: The aim of the study was to apply the recently developed multiple Einstein’s cross wavelet analysis (MECWA) to quantify the coupling of fluctuations of peripherally measured arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) and heart rate (HR). Methods: Two long-term measurements on preterm neonates with a gestational age at birth of 26.4 and 26.8 weeks and a postnatal age of 2.1 and 3.9 weeks were analyzed. MECWA was applied to SpO2, StO2 and HR. Results: MECWA showed that the fluctuations of SpO2, StO2 and HR were synchronized in the low-frequency range with periods of ~1 h and ~0.5 h. The amplitudes of the synchronization frequencies were dependent on the individual neonate. Discussion: MECWA is a useful novel tool to assess the coupling of physiological signals. The parameters determined by MECWA seem to be related to the chronobiological processes, as well as constant regulations of the cardiovascular and cerebral perfusion state. Conclusion: MECWA was able to identify long-term synchronization of the cardiovascular and cerebral perfusion state in preterm neonates with periods of ~1 h and ~0.5 h.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge funding by Nano-Tera (NeoSense, ObeSense), the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Neuroscience Center Zurich (UCL-Zurich Collaboration), The Danish Council for Strategic Resarch (SafeBoosC).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Felix Scholkmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Graciela Velasco Herrera
    • 4
  • Tanja Karen
    • 3
  • Helene Isler
    • 3
  • Daniel Ostojic
    • 3
  • Victor Manuel Velasco Herrera
    • 4
  • Ursula Wolf
    • 2
  • Martin Wolf
    • 3
  1. 1.Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory (BORL), Department of NeonatologyUniversity Hospital Zurich, University of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Institute of Complementary MedicineUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland
  3. 3.Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory (BORL), Department of NeonatologyUniversity Hospital Zurich, University of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  4. 4.Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad UniversitariaCoyoacánMexico

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