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Pain from Nasal Origin: Clinical Case

  • James Y. SuenEmail author
  • Chelsey Smith
Chapter

Abstract

The patient is a 60-year-old white male with a history of severe headaches in the right lateral orbit and temple area for many years. The headaches occurred two to three times a month and would last for almost a week. About two to three times a year, his headaches would be so severe, he would have to be admitted to the hospital for 5–7 days to control his headaches. He was referred by his neurologist to see if we had anything to offer him to help or prevent the headaches.

While getting a detailed history, the patient said that at the onset of his headaches, he would notice discomfort in his right nostril, and over several hours, his right temple would begin hurting and the severe headaches would occur. He had nausea and vomiting with the headaches, and sumatriptan would help some if he took it early into the episode. He was also tried on several anticonvulsants and could not tolerate them. He would require large doses of narcotics in the hospital to control his pain and headaches.

Keywords

Headaches Sluder’s neuralgia Septal spur Nasal turbinates Sphenopalatine ganglion nerve branches Septoplasty 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck SurgeryUniversity of Arkansas for Medical SciencesLittle RockUSA
  2. 2.ENTcareDothanUSA

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