Connecting the Streams

Chapter
Part of the Progressive Energy Policy book series (PEP)

Abstract

For policy change to occur, a policy window must open to allow a policy entrepreneur to connect their preferred solution to a salient problem. This chapter shows that, while a policy window did open in 2013 and 2014, it was narrower and harder for policy actors to navigate than the unambiguous opportunity for change that was present in 2007. Within this complex and unpredictable environment, none of the observed attempts at entrepreneurship were unqualified successes, despite some notable achievements.

Keywords

Policy entrepreneurship Policy windows Advocacy coalitions 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Energy Policy GroupUniversity of ExeterPenrynUK
  2. 2.Norwich Business SchoolUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK

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