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What Is an Active House? A Vision Beyond 2020

  • Lone Feifer
  • Marco Imperadori
  • Graziano Salvalai
  • Arianna Brambilla
  • Federica Brunone
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

International standards and constantly smarter practices are everyday more addressing the issue of a sustainable development. However, this virtuous approach has to involve the final users, in a newer and wider perspective: People First. This is the aim of the Active House Alliance, proposing a new vision for the future of the construction sector. Indoor comfort and occupants’ wellbeing, energy efficiency and renewable sources exploitation, eco-friendly approaches are integrated into new guidelines and technical prescriptions, to help designers in developing the active buildings of the future.

Keywords

Active house People first Guideline AH specification AH radar tool Comfort Energy Environment 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lone Feifer
    • 1
  • Marco Imperadori
    • 2
  • Graziano Salvalai
    • 2
  • Arianna Brambilla
    • 3
  • Federica Brunone
    • 2
  1. 1.Active House AllianceBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Department of ABCPolitecnico di MilanoMilanItaly
  3. 3.School of Architecture, Design and PlanningUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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