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Charting Dissent: Whistleblowing, Civil Disobedience, and Conscientious Objection

  • Daniele Santoro
  • Manohar Kumar
Chapter
  • 339 Downloads
Part of the Philosophy and Politics - Critical Explorations book series (PPCE, volume 6)

Abstract

How should one qualify political whistleblowing within a democratic system, governed by the rule of law? Whistleblowing is often considered a form of principled, sometimes even democratic dissent. In this last chapter, we discuss what kind of dissent whistleblowing is. We discuss various forms of dissent and argue that whistleblowing is neither a case of conscientious objection nor a case of civil disobedience. However—we conclude—it is a distinctive form of civil dissent against the threat of unruled government secrecy.

Keywords

Political whistleblowing Civil disobedience Civil dissent Conscientious objection Dissent 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniele Santoro
    • 1
  • Manohar Kumar
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Ethics, Politics, and Society, ILCHUniversity of MinhoBragaPortugal
  2. 2.Department of Social Sciences and HumanitiesIndraprastha Institute of Information Technology, DelhiNew DelhiIndia

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