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Distinct Characteristics of Modern Civilization

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Emerging Dynamics: Science, Energy, Society and Values
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Abstract

Modern civilization’s most distinct characteristics are due to science and science-based technology. In this Chapter, we exemplify these characteristics focusing on the prevalent impact of science and science-based technology on man, society, the environment and climate change, and on the fundamental role of energy in both science and society.

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Notes

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Christophorou, L.G. (2018). Distinct Characteristics of Modern Civilization. In: Emerging Dynamics: Science, Energy, Society and Values. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90713-0_2

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