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Socializing Tumors: From the Conservation of Tumors in Banks to Their Ontological Variations

Abstract

Biobanks are thus considered as developing infrastructures calling for a joint political, ethical and legal regulation. They are a focus for action. But how do matters stand when biobanks are a sociological focus of research, released from performative issues, when “the social” is not seen as the equivalent of “society” which causes problems or generates constraints in relation to the access and the use of parts of the human body? A theoretical approach to the social as an attachment process between human and non-human entities raises the question of biobanks being considered as a body of living organisms socialization, meaning a place where human and non-human entities are associated, where the human body is broken up.

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Scheme 8.1
Scheme 8.2
Scheme 8.3
Scheme 8.4
Scheme 8.5

Notes

  1. 1.

    For a critical review of the literature see Lafontaine (2014).

  2. 2.

    Re-source, re-surgerer in Latin; to appear again.

  3. 3.

    There are about 60 of them in France. For more information, cf. Les tumorothèques hospitalières. Recommandations à l’usage des cliniciens et des chercheurs, Collection “Recommandations professionnelles” published by Institut National du Cancer (Inca), Boulogne-Billancourt, 2006.

  4. 4.

    For a theoretical perspective on the notion of grasp, see the work of Bessy and Chateauraynaud (1995, reissued in 2015).

  5. 5.

    The ultra-microtome is a device that performs cuts of 80 nm thick on samples included in blocks of very hard resin. The elements of the examined cell can then be magnified up to 100,000 times under a beam of electrons. As for the cryotome, it enables cutting at low temperatures (−25 °C) a sample, previously frozen, into thin sections (a few micrometers), which will be colored after having been placed on a transparent slide.

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Correspondence to Fabien Milanovic .

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Milanovic, F. (2018). Socializing Tumors: From the Conservation of Tumors in Banks to Their Ontological Variations. In: Bioy, X. (eds) Public Regulation of Tumor Banks. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90563-1_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90563-1_8

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