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Introduction: ‘R2P Has Begun to Change the World’

  • Aidan HehirEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In his first report on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) since becoming UN Secretary-General, António Guterres noted, ‘There is a gap between our stated commitment to the responsibility to protect and the daily reality confronted by populations exposed to the risk of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity’ (2017, p. 1). Guterres thus succinctly identified the paradox that is the focus of this book; R2P is more popular amongst states than ever, yet state-sponsored oppression, and indeed atrocity crimes, are on the rise.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Politics and International RelationsUniversity of WestminsterLondonUK

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