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Cultivation of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) in Desert Ecoregion

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Part of the Environment & Policy book series (ENPO, volume 58)

Abstract

Field experiments with the Andean grain crop, quinoa (keen-waa) were tested in three localities of United Arab Emirates at two, three and five sowing densities in 2016–2017. Four quinoa genotypes were utilized (two selected quinoa lines: ICBA-Q3 and ICBA-Q5; and two introduced quinoa genotypes: Titicaca and Amarilla Sacaca). Sowing density did not affect aerial and ground dry biomass. However, grain yield and harvest index were different among quinoa genotypes. Quantity of irrigation had effect on the production of biomass as in Dubai and Al Dhaid, though water with low salinity was used. Photoperiod and temperature were appropriate for the growth and development of quinoa genotypes in the three localities. Quinoa genotypes can grow in sandy native soils. The period used for cultivating quinoa between October to February were optimal than April. Conditions of drip irrigation should be similar, nevertheless in Abu Dhabi the conditions were at farmer level and it should be optimized.

Keywords

Hot temperature Quinoa genotypes United Arab Emirates 

Notes

Acknowledgement

Many thanks to Mr. Gangaram Timalsina (QBG), Mr. Sameer Faryz El Shaid (Organic farming manager, Al Rahba, Abu Dhabi), Engr. Ahmed Mohammed Saeed and Mr. Sultan Abdulla Saif and the technicians at the Agricultural Innovation Centre in Al Dhaid from the Ministry of Climate Change & Environment (MOCCAE) for their support in the field work. This research was supported by the CORE project of ICBA.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research and Innovation DivisionInternational Center for Biosaline Agriculture, ICBADubaiUnited Arab Emirates
  2. 2.Agricultural Research DepartmentMinistry of Climate Change & EnvironmentDubaiUnited Arab Emirates
  3. 3.Institute of Agronomy & Veterinary Hassan IIRabatMorocco
  4. 4.Mohammed VI Polytechnic UniversityAfrican Sustainable Agriculture Research InstituteLaayouneMorocco

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