Skip to main content

Multidisciplinary Approaches to Alternative Food Networks

  • 666 Accesses

Abstract

In this chapter, Corsi, Barbera, Dansero, Orlando, and Peano present the general theoretical framework for the research described in this volume. They discuss the concept of Alternative Food Networks as presented in the literature and the criteria of “alternativeness” on which it is based (length of the chain, local origin, embeddedness), arguing that the main factor that determines whether a chain can be considered alternative is the quality of the exchange relationship, that is, the fact that in AFNs the exchange is not only a question of selling a commodity for money, but produces benefits in itself. They review the current approaches to AFNs in different disciplines—economics, sociology, geography, anthropology, and environmental sciences—and present the approach followed in this book.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-90409-2_2
  • Chapter length: 38 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-90409-2
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   179.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    Even the use of online and social media by participants in short food supply chains only supplements existing reconnections between producers and consumers and cannot substitute for personal relationships (Bos & Owen, 2016; Fonte, 2013)

  2. 2.

    The MWTP is the maximum amount of money consumers would pay for an additional quantity of the good. The consumer purchases additional quantities of the good until the utility provided by them is greater than the utility foregone by paying the price of an additional quantity of the good, that is, the utility lost by giving up other goods that could have been purchased with the same money.

  3. 3.

    These two streams (orders of worth and worlds of production) are summarized in Lucien Karpik’s perspective, where worlds of quality pair with different judgement devices that provide consumers with the knowledge to evaluate the “worth of goods” (Karpik, 2010, p. 96).

  4. 4.

    It is interesting to note that geographers like Renting et al. (2003), or Kneafsey (2010) now prefer the term SFSCs to AFNs and have also pointed out some distinctions between the concept of “local food system” as widely used in the early American studies. See in particular the distinctions and the choices made in the wider area of the study commissioned by the JRC (Kneafsey et al., 2013).

  5. 5.

    In this regard, see the distinction between the phases of the debate that we have proposed elsewhere (Dansero & Puttilli, 2013, p. 628).

References

  • Adam, K. L. (2006). Community Supported Agriculture, Attra. Retrieved from www.attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/csa.html; www.attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/PDF/csa.pdf

  • Appadurai, A. (Ed.). (1986). The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Aubry, C., & Chiffoleau, Y. (2009). Le développement des circuits courts et l’agriculture péri-urbaine: histoire, évolution en cours et questions actuelles. Innovations agronomiques, 5, 53–67.

    Google Scholar 

  • Audifredi, S. (2012). In Pursuit of Quality. The Institutional Change of Wine Production Market in Piedmont. Sociologia Ruralis, 52(3), 311–331.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barbera, F. (2016). Development. In G. Ritzer (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of Sociology. London: Basil Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781405165518.wbeos0817

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barbera, F., & Audifredi, S. (2012). In Pursuit of Quality. The Institutional Change of Wine Production Market in Piedmont. Sociologia Ruralis, 52(3), 311–331.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barbera, F., & Dagnes, J. (2017). Le filiere agroalimentari alternative a Torino e in Piemonte: una questione di qualità. Bollettino Società Geografica Italiana, Serie XIII, X, 169–179 (English Version Available).

    Google Scholar 

  • Barbera, F., Dagnes, J., & Di Monaco, R. (2018). Mimetic Quality: Consumer Quality Conventions and Strategic Mimicry in Food Distribution. International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, 24(2), 253–273.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barham, E. (2003). Translating Terroir: The Global Challenge of French AOC Labeling. Journal of Rural Studies, 19, 127–138.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barnard, A. (2000). History and Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barth, F., Gingrich, A., Parkin, R., & Silverman, S. (2005). One Discipline, Four Ways: British, German, French, and American Anthropology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Besky, S. (2014). The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair Trade Tea Plantations in India. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Black, R. (2012). Porta Palazzo. The Anthropology on an Italian Market. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boltanski, L., & Thévenot, L. (1991). De la justification: les économies de la grandeur. Paris: Gallimard. English Translation.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boltanski, L., & Thévenot, L. (2006). On Justification: Economies of Worth. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Born, B., & Purcell, M. (2006). Avoiding the Local Trap: Scale and Food Systems in Planning Research. Journal of Planning Education and Research, 26(2), 195–207.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bos, E., & Owen, L. (2016). Virtual Reconnection: The Online Spaces of Alternative Food Networks in England. Journal of Rural Studies, 45, 1–14.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Brunori, G. (2008). Local Food and Alternative Food Networks: A Communication Perspective. Anthropology of Food, S2, March.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brunori, G., Galli, F., Barjolle, D., van Broekhuizen, R., Colombo, L., Giampietro, M., et al. (2016). Are Local Food Chains More Sustainable than Global Food Chains? Considerations for Assessment. Sustainability, 8(5), 449.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bullard, N. (2011). It’s Too Late for Sustainability: What We Need Is System Change. Development, 54(2), 141–142.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carolan, M. (2017). More-than-Active Food Citizens: A Longitudinal and Comparative Study of Alternative and Conventional Eaters. Rural Sociology, 82(2), 197–225.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carrier, J. G. (1995). Gifts and Commodities. Exchange and Western Capitalism Since 1700. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carrier, J., & Luetchford, P. (Eds.). (2012). Ethical Consumption: Social Value and Economic Practice. New York: Berghahn.

    Google Scholar 

  • Coley, D., Howard, M., & Winter, M. (2009). Local Food, Food Miles and Carbon Emissions: A Comparison of Farm Shop and Mass Distribution Approaches. Food Policy, 34(2), 150–155.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cook, I., Hobson, K., Hallett, L., IV, Guthman, J., Murphy, A., Hulme, A., et al. (2011). Geographies of Food: ‘Afters’. Progress in Human Geography, 35(1), 104–120.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cook, I., et al. (2006). Geographies of Food: Following. Progress in Human Geography, 30(5), 655–666. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0309132506070183

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cook, I., et al. (2008). Geographies of Food: Mixing. Progress in Human Geography, 32(6), 821–833. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0309132506070183

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Counihan, C. (2004). Around the Tuscan Table. Food, Family and Gender in Twentieth Century Florence. London: Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Counihan, C., & Siniscalchi, V. (Eds.). (2013). Food Activism. Agency, Democracy, Economy. London: Bloomsbury.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dansero, E., Pettenati, G., & Toldo, A. (2016). Si proche et pourtant si loin. Etudier et construire la proximité alimentaire à Turin. In P. Mundler & J. Rouchier (Eds.), Alimentation et proximité: jeux d’acteurs et territoires. Educagri: Dijon.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dansero, E., & Puttilli, M. (2013). Multiple Territorialities of Alternative Food Networks: Six Cases from Piedmont, Italy. Local Environment, 19(6), 626–643.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • De Neve, G. P. (2008). In J. P. Luetchford & D. Wood (Eds.), Hidden Hands in the Market: Ethnographies of Fair Trade, Ethical Consumption, and Corporate Social Responsibility. Bingley: Emerald.

    Google Scholar 

  • De Schutter, O. (2012). The Adequacy of Diets and the Right to Food. Report presented at the 19th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council. UN doc. A/HRC/19/59.

    Google Scholar 

  • De Schutter, O. (2017). The Political Economy of Food Systems Reform. European Review of Agricultural Economics, 44(3), 705–731.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • DEFRA. (2005). The Validity of Food Miles as an Indicator of Sustainable Development. Defra, 7, p. 117.

    Google Scholar 

  • DeLind, L., & Bingen, J. (2005). Be Careful What You Wish For: Democratic Challenges and Political Opportunities for the Michigan Organic Community. Culture and Agriculture, 27(2), 131–143.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • DeLind, L. B. (2000). Transforming Organic Agriculture into Industrial Organic Products: Reconsidering National Organic Standards. Human Organization, 59(2), 198–208.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • van der Ploeg, J. D. (2008). The New Peasantries: Struggles for Autonomy and Sustainability in an Era of Empire and Globalization. London: Earthscan.

    Google Scholar 

  • van der Ploeg, J. D. (2010). The Peasantries of the Twenty-First Century: The Commoditisation Debate Revisited. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 37(1), 1–30.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Der Ploeg, J. D., Renting, H., Brunori, G., Knickel, K., Mannion, J., Marsden, T., et al. (2000). Rural Development: From Practices and Policies Towards Theory. Sociologia Ruralis, 40(4), 391–408.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Desrochers, P., & Shimizu, H. (2012). The Locavore’s Dilemma: In Praise of the 10,000-Mile Diet. New York: Public Affairs.

    Google Scholar 

  • DuPuis, E. M., & Goodman, D. (2005). Should We Go “Home” to Eat?: Toward a Reflexive Politics of Localism. Journal of Rural Studies, 21, 359–371.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Edwards-Jones, G., Milà i Canals, L., Hounsome, N., Truninger, M., Koerber, G., Hounsome, B., et al. (2008). Testing the Assertion that “Local Food Is Best”: The Challenges of an Evidence-Based Approach. Trends in Food Science and Technology, 19(5), 265–274. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2008.01.008

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Foley, J. A., Ramankutty, N., Brauman, K. A., Cassidy, E. S., Gerber, J. S., Johnston, M., et al. (2011). Solutions for a Cultivated Planet. Nature, 478, 337–342.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fonte, M. (2013). Food Consumption as Social Practice: Solidarity Purchasing Groups in Rome, Italy. Journal of Rural Studies, 32, 230–239.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Forssell, S., & Lankoski, L. (2014). The Sustainability Promise of Alternative Food Networks: An Examination through ‘Alternative’ Characteristics. Agriculture and Human Values, 32(1), 63–75.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gereffi, G., Humphrey, J., & Sturgeon, T. (2005). The Governance of Global Value Chains. Review of International Political Economy, 12(1), 78–104.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Godelier, M. (1998). The Enigma of the Gift. Cambridge: Polity.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodman, D. (2009). Place and Space in Alternative Food Networks: Connecting Production and Consumption, WP 21. Environment, Politics and Development Working Paper Series, Department of Geography, King’s College London.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodman, D., Goodman, M., & DuPuis, M. (2011). Alternative Food Networks: Knowledge, Place and Politics. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodman, D., & Goodman, M. K. (2009). Food Networks, Alternative. In R. Kitchin & N. Thrift (Eds.), International Encyclopaedia of Human Geography (pp. 208–220). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Goodman, M. (2004). Reading Fair Trade: Political Ecological Imaginary and the Moral Economy of Fair Trade Foods. Political Geography, 23(7), 891–915.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Grasseni, C. (2013). Beyond Alternative Food Networks. Italy’s Solidarity Purchase Groups, London: Bloomsbury Academic.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gregory, C. A. (1982). Gifts and Commodities. New York: Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gregory, C. A. (1997). Savage Money. The Anthropology and Politics of Commodity Exchange. Amsterdam: Harwood.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gui, B. (2000). Beyond Transactions: On the Interpersonal Dimension of Economic Reality. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, 71(2), 139–169.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gui, B. (2005). From Transactions to Encounters: The Joint Generation of Relational Goods and Conventional Values. In B. Gui & R. Sugden (Eds.), Economics and Social Interactions (pp. 23–51). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gui, B., & Stanca, L. (2010). Happiness and Relational Goods: Well-Being and Interpersonal Relations in the Economic Sphere. International Review of Economics, 57(2), 105–118.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hammersley, M., & Atkinson, P. (2007). Ethnography. Principles in Practice (3rd ed.). London: Routledge.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hann, C., & Hart, K. (Eds.). (2009). Market and Society. The Great Transformation Today. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hann, C., & Hart, K. (Eds.). (2011). Economic Anthropology. History, Ethnography, Critique. Cambridge: Polity.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harvey, D. (2006). Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development. New York: Verso.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heatherington, T. (2011). Introduction: Remaking Rural Landscapes in Twenty-First Century Europe, in Politicking the Farm: Transitions and Transformations in European Agriculture. Anthropological Journal of European Cultures, 20(1), 1–9.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hinrichs, C. C. (2003). The Practice and Politics of Food System Localization. Journal of Rural Studies, 19(1), 33–45.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Honkanen, P., Verplanken, B., & Ottar Olsen, S. (2006). Ethical Values and Motives Driving Organic Food Choice. Journal of Consumer Behaviour, 5, 420–430.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Huffman, W. E. (1980). Farm and Off-Farm Work Decisions: Role of Human Capital. The Review of Economics and Statistics, 62, 14–23.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Isenhour, C. (2010). Building Sustainable Societies: A Swedish Case Study on the Limits of Reflexive Modernization. American Ethnologist, 37(3), 511–525.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jackson, A. (Ed.). (1987). Anthropology at Home. London: Tavistock Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jarosz, L. (2008). The City in the Country: Growing Alternative Food Networks in Metropolitan Areas. Journal of Rural Studies, 24(3), 231–244.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jessop, B., Brenner, N., & Jones, M. (2008). Theorizing Sociospatial Relations. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 26(3), 389–401.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jung, Y., Klein, J. A., & Caldwell, M. L. (Eds.). (2014). Ethical Eating in the Postsocialist and Socialist World. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kahneman, D., & Knetsch, J. L. (1992). Valuing Public Goods: The Purchase of Moral Satisfaction. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 22, 57–70.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Karpik, L. (2010). Valuing the Unique: The Economics of Singularities. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • King, R. P., Hand, M. S., DiGiacomo, G., Clancy, K., Gomez, M. I., Hardesty, S. D., et al. (2010). Comparing the Structure, Size, and Performance of Local and Mainstream Food Supply Chains. ERR-99, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. June 2010.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kneafsey, M. (2010). The Region in Food—Important or Irrelevant? Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, 3(2), 177–190.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kneafsey, M., Venn, L., Schmutz, U., Balazs, B., Trenchard, L., Eyden-Wood, T., et al. (2013). short food supply chains and Local Food Systems in the E.U. A State of Play of Their Socio-Economic Characteristics (F. Santini & S. Gomez y Paloma, Eds.). JRC Scientific and Policy Reports, Luxembourg, Publications Office of the European Union.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kremer, P., & DeLiberty, T. L. (2011). Local Food Practices and Growing Potential: Mapping the Case of Philadelphia. Applied Geography, 21, 1252–1261.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lamine, C. (2005). Settling Shared Uncertainties: Local Partnerships Between Producers and Consumers. Sociologia Ruralis, 45(4), 324–345.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lancaster, K. J. (1966). A New Approach to Consumer Theory. Journal of Political Economy., 74(2), 132–157.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Latouche, S. (2009). Farewell to Growth. London: Polity.

    Google Scholar 

  • Levkoe, C. Z. (2006). Learning Democracy Through Food Justice Movements. Agriculture and Human Values, 23(1), 89–98.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lévy, J. (1997). Europe. Une géographie. Paris: Hachette.

    Google Scholar 

  • Luetchford, P. (2014). Food and Consumption. In J. Pratt & P. Luetchford (Eds.), Food for Change. The Politics and Values of Social Movements (pp. 47–70). London: Pluto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lyon, S., Ailshire, S., & Sehon, A. (2014). Fair Trade Consumption and the Limits to Solidarity. Human Organization, 73(2), 141–152.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • MacClancy, J. (Ed.). (2002). Exotic No More. Anthropology on the Front Lines. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maestripieri, L. (2016). Solidarity Purchasing Groups. CRESSI Working Paper, 29.

    Google Scholar 

  • Malinowski, B. (1922/2007). Argonauts of the Western Pacific. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marsden, T., Banks, J., & Bristow, G. (2000). Food Supply Chain Approaches: Exploring Their Role in Rural Development. Sociologia Ruralis, 40(4), 424–438.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Marsden, T., Banks, J., & Bristow, G. (2002). The Social Management of Rural Nature: Understanding Agrarian-Based Rural Development. Environment and Planning A, 34(5), 809–825.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mauss, M. (1925/2016). The Gift. Selected, Annotated, and Translated by Jane I. Guyer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • McMichael, F. (2012). Development and Social Change. London: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Miller, D. (1987). Material Culture and Mass Consumption. Oxford: Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moberg, M. (2016). Market’s End: Fair-Trade Social Premiums as Development in Dominica. American Ethnologist, 43(4), 677–690.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Morris, C., & Kirwan, J. (2011). Ecological Embeddedness: An Interrogation and Refinement of the Concept Within the Context of Alternative Food Networks in the UK. Journal of Rural Studies, 27(3), 322–330.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mount, P. (2012). Growing Local Food: Scale and Local Food Systems Governance. Agriculture and Human Values, 29(1), 107–121. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10460-011-9331-0

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Murdoch, J., Marsden, T., & Banks, J. (2000). Quality, Nature, and Embeddedness: Some Theoretical Considerations in the Context of the Food Sector. Economic Geography, 76(2), 107–125.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Murdoch, J., & Miele, M. (1999). “Back to Nature”: Changing “Worlds of Production” in the Food Sector. Sociologia Ruralis, 39(4), 465–483.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Murdoch, J., & Miele, M. (2004). A New Aesthetic of Food? Relational Reflexivity in the ‘Alternative’ Food Movement. In M. Harvey, A. McMeekin, & A. Warde (Eds.), Qualities of Food (pp. 156–175). Manchester: Manchester University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Okura Gagné, N. (2011). Eating Local in a U.S. City: Reconstructing “Community”—a Third Place—in a Global Neoliberal Economy. American Ethnologist, 38(2), 281–293.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Orlando, G. (2018). From the Risk Society to Risk Practice: Organic Food, Embodiment and Modernity in Sicily. Food, Culture & Society, 21(2), 144–163.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Parry, J., & Bloch, M. (Eds.). (1989). Money and the Morality of Exchange. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paxton, A. (1994). The Food Miles Report. London: Sustainable Agriculture, Food & Environment (SAFE) Alliance.

    Google Scholar 

  • Polanyi, K. (1944/2001). The Great Transformation. The Political and Economic Origins of Our Times. Boston: Beacon Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Polanyi, K. (1957). The Economy as Instituted Process. In K. Polanyi, C. Arensberg, & H. Pearson (Eds.), Trade and Markets in the Early Empires. Economy in History and Theory (pp. 243–270). New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Polanyi, K. (1977). The Livelihood of Man. New York: Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ponte, S. (2009). Governing through Quality: Conventions and Supply Relations in the Value Chain for South African Wine. Sociologia Ruralis, 39(3), 236–257.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ponte, S. (2016). Convention Theory in the Anglophone Agro-food Literature: Past, Present and Future. Journal of Rural Studies, 44, 12–23.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Popke, J. (2006). Geography and Ethics: Everyday Mediations Through Care and Consumption. Progress in Human Geography, 30(4), 504–512.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pratt, J. (2009). Incorporation and Resistance: Analytical Issues in the Conventionalization Debate and Alternative Food Chains. Journal of Agrarian Change, 9(2), 155–174.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pratt, J. (2014). Farming and Its Values. In J. Pratt & P. Luetchford (Eds.), Food for Change. The Politics and Values of Social Movements (pp. 24–46). London: Pluto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pratt, J., & Luetchford, P. (2014). Food for Change. The Politics and Values of Social Movements. London: Pluto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Raffestin, C. (2012). Space, Territory, and Territoriality. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 30(1), 121–141.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rakopoulos, T. (2014). The Crisis Seen from Below, Within, and Against: From Solidarity Economy to Food Distribution Cooperatives in Greece. Dialectical Anthropology, 38, 189–207.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rakopoulos, T. (2017). From Clans to Co-ops. Confiscated Mafia Land in Sicily. Oxford: Berghahn.

    Google Scholar 

  • Renting, H., Marsden, T., & Banks, J. (2003). Understanding Alternative Food Networks: Exploring the Role of short food supply chains in Rural Development. Environment and Planning A, 35(3), 393–411.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Robben, A. C. G. M., & Sluka, J. A. (Eds.). (2007). Ethnographic Fieldwork. An Anthropological Reader. Oxford: Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rodgers, A., Woodward, A., Boyd, S., & Dietz, W. H. (2018). Prevalence Trends Tell Us What Did Not Precipitate the US Obesity Epidemic. The Lancet Public Health. Online First. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S246826671830021

  • Rosen, S. (1974). Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition. The Journal of Political Economy, 82(1), 34–55.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sage, C. (2003a). Social Embeddedness and Relations of Regard: Alternative ‘Good Food’ Networks in South-West Ireland. Journal of Rural Studies, 19(1), 47–60.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sage, C. (2003b). Quality in Alternative Food Networks: Conventions, Regulations and Governance. Paper presented at the International Seminar “Policies, Governance and Innovation for Rural Areas”, 21–23 November 2003, Università della Calabria, Arcavacata di Rende.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sahlins, M. (1974). Stone Age Economics. London: Tavistock.

    Google Scholar 

  • Salais, R., & Storper, M. (1992). The Four ‘Worlds’ of Contemporary Industry. Cambridge Journal of Economics, 16, 169–193.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sassatelli, R. (2015). Consumer Culture, Sustainability and a New Vision of Consumer Sovereignty. Sociologia Ruralis, 55(4), 483–496.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sassatelli, R., & Davolio, F. (2010). Consumption, Pleasure and Politics. Slow Food and the Politico-aesthetic Problematization of Food. Journal of Consumer Culture, 10(2), 1–31.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Scharber, H., & Dancs, A. (2016). Do Locavores Have a Dilemma? Economic Discourse and the Local Food Critique. Agriculture and Human Values, 33(1), 121–133.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Singh, I., Squire, L., & Strauss, J. (Eds.). (1986). Agricultural Household Models: Extensions, Applications, and Policy. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sonnino, R., & Marsden, T. (2006). Alternative Food Networks in the South West of England: Towards a New Agrarian Eco-Economy? In T. Marsden & J. Murdoch (Eds.), Between the Local and the Global (Research in Rural Sociology and Development, Volume 12) (pp. 299–322). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

    Google Scholar 

  • Storper, M., & Salais, R. (1997). Worlds of Production: The Action Frameworks of the Economy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stræte, E. P., & Marsden, T. (2006). Exploring Dimensions of Qualities in Food. In T. Marsden & J. Murdoch (Eds.), Between the Local and the Global (Research in Rural Sociology and Development, Volume 12) (pp. 269–297). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

    Google Scholar 

  • Strathern, M. (1988). The Gender of the Gift. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thurnwald, R. (1932). Economics in Primitive Communities. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tregear, A. (2011). Progressing Knowledge in Alternative and Local Food Networks: Critical Reflections and a Research Agenda. Journal of Rural Studies, 27(4), 419–430.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Uhlaner, C. (1989). Relational Goods and Participation: Incorporating Sociability into a Theory of Rational Action. Public Choice, 62, 253–285.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Van Passel, S. (2013). Food Miles to Assess Sustainability: A Revision. Sustainable Development, 21(1), 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1002/sd.485

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Venn, L., Kneafsey, M., Holloway, L., Cox, R., Dowler, E., & Tuomainen, H. (2006). Researching European ‘Alternative’ Food Networks: Some Methodological Considerations. Area, 38(3), 248–258.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Verhaegen, I., & Van Huylenbroeck, G. (2001). Costs and Benefits for Farmers Participating in Innovative Marketing Channels for Quality Food Products. Journal of Rural Studies, 17, 443–456.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vermeir, I., & Verbeke, W. (2006). Sustainable Food Consumption: Exploring the Consumer “Attitude Behavior Intention” Gap. Journal of Agriculture and Environmental Ethics, 19(2), 169–194.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Watts, D. C., Ilbery, B., & Maye, D. (2005). Making Reconnections in Agro-food Geography: Alternative Systems of Food Provision. Progress in Human Geography, 29(1), 22–40.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Weiner, A. (1992). Inalienable Possessions. The Paradox of Keeping While Giving. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Whatmore, S., & Thorne, L. (1997). Nourishing Networks. Alternative Geographies of Food. In D. Goodman, M. Watts, & M. J. Watts (Eds.), Globalising Food: Agrarian Questions and Global Restructuring (pp. 211–224). London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilk, R. R., & Gliggett, L. (2007). Economies and Cultures. Foundations of Economic Anthropology (2nd ed.). Boulder: Westview Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Winter, M. (2003). Geographies of Food: Agro-food Geographies Making Reconnections. Progress in Human Geography, 27(4), 505–513.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Winter, M. (2004). Geographies of Food: Agro-food Geographies—Farming, Food and Politics. Progress in Human Geography, 28(5), 664–670.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Alessandro Corsi .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2018 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Corsi, A., Barbera, F., Dansero, E., Orlando, G., Peano, C. (2018). Multidisciplinary Approaches to Alternative Food Networks. In: Corsi, A., Barbera, F., Dansero, E., Peano, C. (eds) Alternative Food Networks. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90409-2_2

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90409-2_2

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-90408-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-90409-2

  • eBook Packages: Economics and FinanceEconomics and Finance (R0)