Skip to main content

Nonverbal Communication

Abstract

The present chapter focuses on the relation between nonverbal communication and globality. Firstly it describes, from a historical perspective, the theoretical development concerning body language, starting with its inclusion in ancient rhetoric unto the creation of the concept of “nonverbal communication” in the middle of the twentieth century. According to the worldwide increase of intercultural contact and interaction caused by the effects of globalization, the chapter reveals and discusses in which way, as a result of this, the increased crossing-over of cultural coded habits, in addition to changing individual body consciousness, challenges humanity as well as scholars in the study of the nonverbal sphere, addressing also the areas of electronic media and Internet-based communication.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-90377-4_38
  • Chapter length: 9 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   189.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-90377-4
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   249.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    Jürgen Ruesch/Weldon Kees, Nonverbal Communication. Notes on the Visual Perception of Human Relations, Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1956.

  2. 2.

    Cf. Paul Watzlawick/Janet Beavin Bavelas/Don D. Jackson, Pragmatics of Human Communication: A study of interactional patterns, pathologies, and paradoxes, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

  3. 3.

    Cf. Edward T. Hall, The Silent Language, New York: Doubleday, 1959.

  4. 4.

    Michael Argyle, Bodily Communication, London: Methuen&Co., 1975.

  5. 5.

    Hartwig Kalverkämper, Nonverbale Kommunikation, in: Ingo Kolboom/Thomas Kotschi/Edward Reichel (eds.), Handbuch Französisch: Sprache-Literatur-Kultur-Gesellschaft: Für Studium, Lehre, Praxis, Berlin: Schmidt, 2008 (2nd edition), p. 374.

  6. 6.

    Ibid., p. 381.

  7. 7.

    Adam Kendon, On the Origins of Modern Gesture Studies, in: Susan D. Duncan/Justine Cassell/Elena T. Levy (eds.), Gesture and the Dynamic Dimension of Language. Essays in Honor of David McNeill, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 2007, p. 25.

  8. 8.

    Adam Kendon, Did Gesture Have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel?, in: Wolfgang Aaron (ed.), Nonverbal Behavior: Perspectives, Applications, Intercultural Insights, Lewiston, NY: Hogrefe 1984, p. 89.

  9. 9.

    Cf. Jürgen Streeck, Gesturecraft: The Manu-facture of Meaning, (Gesture Studies, Vol. 2), Amsterdam: Benjamins, 2009.

  10. 10.

    Hartwig Kalverkämper, Nonverbale Kommunikation, op. cit., p. 376.

  11. 11.

    Ekman cited in Adam Kendon, Did Gesture Have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel?, op. cit., p. 94.

  12. 12.

    Cf. George L. Trager, Paralanguage: A first approximation, in: Studies in Linguistics, 13/1958, pp. 1–12.

  13. 13.

    Cf. Edward T. Hall, The Hidden Dimension. New York: Anchor Books, 1966.

  14. 14.

    Cf. Ray L. Birdwhistell, Kinesics and Context. Essays on Body Motion Communication, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1970.

  15. 15.

    Cf. Hartwig Kalverkämper, Nonverbale Kommunikation, op. cit., pp. 374–375.

  16. 16.

    Ibid., p. 376.

  17. 17.

    Patterson cited in Michael L. Hecht/Peter A. Andersen/Sidney A. Ribeau, The Cultural Dimensions of Nonverbal Communication, in: Handbook of International and Intercultural Communication, Newbury Park: Sage, 1989, p. 165.

  18. 18.

    Cf. Adam Kendon, On the Origins of Modern Gesture Studies, loc. cit.

  19. 19.

    Cf. Hartwig Kalverkämper, Nonverbale Kommunikation, op. cit., p. 379.

  20. 20.

    Cf. Adam Kendon, Did Gesture Have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel? loc. cit.

  21. 21.

    Cf. David Matsumoto/Hyisung C. Hwang, Culture and Nonverbal Communication, in: Judith A. Hall/Mark L. Knapp (eds.), Nonverbal Communication. (Handbooks of Communication Science [HoCS], Vol. 2), Berlin: De Gruyter, 2013, pp. 697–728.

  22. 22.

    Ibid., p. 704.

  23. 23.

    Cf. Ibid., p. 700.

  24. 24.

    Adam Kendon, Did Gesture Have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel?, op. cit., pp. 98–99.

  25. 25.

    Cf. Ibid., p. 90.

  26. 26.

    For instance, John D. Bonvillian/Vicky L. Ingram/Brendan M. McCleary, Observations on the Use of Manual Signs and Gestures in the Communicative Interactions Between Native Americans and Spanish Explorers of North America: The Accounts of Bernal Díaz del Castillo and Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, in: Sign Language Studies 9/2009, pp. 132–165.

  27. 27.

    Hartwig Kalverkämper, Nonverbale Kommunikation, op. cit., p. 374.

  28. 28.

    David Matsumoto/Hyisung C. Hwang, Culture and Nonverbal Communication, op. cit., p. 707.

  29. 29.

    Adam Kendon, Did Gesture Have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel? op. cit., pp. 99–100.

  30. 30.

    Max Kirch, Nonverbal Communication in Cross-Cultural Perspective, in: Robert J. Di Pietro/William Frawley/Alfred Wedel (eds.), The First Delaware Symposium on Language Studies. Selected Papers, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1983, p. 102.

  31. 31.

    David Matsumoto/Hyisung C. Hwang, Culture and Nonverbal Communication, op. cit., p. 713.

  32. 32.

    Cf. Max Kirch, Nonverbal Communication in Cross-Cultural Perspective, op. cit., pp. 102–103.

  33. 33.

    Joel Sherzer cited in Adam Kendon, Did Gesture Have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel?, op. cit., p. 97.

  34. 34.

    Cf. Henk Driessen, Gestured Masculinity: Body and Sociability in Rural Andalusia, in: Jan Bremmer/Herman Roodenburg (eds.), A Cultural History of Gesture. From Antiquity to the Present Day. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991, pp. 237–252.

  35. 35.

    Michael L. Hecht/Peter A. Andersen/Sidney A. Ribeau, The Cultural Dimensions of Nonverbal Communication, in: Handbook of International and Intercultural Communication, Newbury Park: Sage, 1989, p. 167.

  36. 36.

    Cf. Edward T. Hall, Beyond Culture, New York: Anchor Books, 1976; Idem., The Dance of Life: The other dimension of time, New York: Doubleday, 1984.

  37. 37.

    Cf. Michael L. Hecht et al., The Cultural Dimensions of Nonverbal Communication, op. cit., pp. 168; 176–177.

  38. 38.

    Cf. David Matsumoto/Hyisung C. Hwang, Culture and Nonverbal Communication, op. cit., p. 715.

  39. 39.

    Cf. Ibid., pp. 707–708.

  40. 40.

    Cf. Ibid., p. 712.

  41. 41.

    Cf. Ibid., pp. 709f.

  42. 42.

    Ibid., p. 714.

  43. 43.

    Keith Thomas, Introduction, in: Jan Bremmer/Herman Roodenburg (eds.), A Cultural History of Gesture. From Antiquity to the Present Day, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991, p. 11.

  44. 44.

    Cf. Hartwig Kalverkämper, Nonverbale Kommunikation, op. cit., pp. 380–381.

Literature

  • Argyle, Michael, Bodily Communication, London: Methuen & Co., 1975.

    Google Scholar 

  • Birdwhistell, Ray L., Kinesics and Context. Essays on Body Motion Communication, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1970.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bonvillian, John D./Ingram, V.L./McCleary, Brendan M., Observations on the Use of Manual Signs and Gestures in the Communicative Interactions between Native Americans and Spanish Explorers of North America. The Accounts of Bernal Díaz del Castillo and Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, in: Sign Language Studies 9/2009, pp. 132–165.

    Google Scholar 

  • Driessen, Henk, Gestured Masculinity. Body and Sociability in Rural Andalusia, in: Bremmer, Jan/Roodenburg, Herman (eds.), A Cultural History of Gesture. From Antiquity to the Present Day. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991, pp. 237–252.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, Edward T., The Silent Language, New York: Doubleday, 1959.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, Edward T., The Hidden Dimension, New York: Anchor Books, 1966.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, Edward T., Beyond Culture, New York: Anchor Books, 1976.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, Edward T., The Dance of Life: The other dimension of time, New York: Doubleday, 1984.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hecht, Michael L./Andersen, Peter A./Ribeau, Sidney A., The Cultural Dimensions of Nonverbal Communication, in: Handbook of International and Intercultural Communication, Newbury Park: Sage, 1989, pp. 163–185.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kalverkämper, Hartwig, Nonverbale Kommunikation, in: Kolboom, Ingo/Kotschi, Thomas/Reichel, Edward (eds.), Handbuch Französisch. Sprache-Literatur-Kultur-Gesellschaft: Für Studium, Lehre, Praxis, Berlin: Schmidt, 2008, (2nd edition), pp. 374–383.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kendon, Adam, Did Gesture have the Happiness to Escape the Curse at the Confusion of Babel?, in: Aaron, Wolfgang (ed.), Nonverbal Behavior. Perspectives, Applications, Intercultural Insights, Lewiston, NY: Hogrefe 1984, pp. 75–114.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kendon, Adam, On the Origins of Modern Gesture Studies, in: Duncan, Susan D./Cassell, Justine/Levy, Elena T. (eds.), Gesture and the Dynamic Dimension of Language. Essays in Honor of David McNeill, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 2007, pp. 13–28.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kirch, Max, Nonverbal Communication in Cross-Cultural Perspective, in: Di Pietro, Robert J./Frawley, William/Wedel, Alfred (eds.), The First Delaware Symposium on Language Studies. Selected Papers, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1983, pp. 99–105.

    Google Scholar 

  • Matsumoto, David/Hwang, Hyisung C., Culture and Nonverbal Communication, in: Hall, Judith A./Knapp, Mark L. (eds.), Nonverbal Communication. (Handbooks of Communication Science [HoCS], Vol. 2), Berlin: De Gruyter, 2013, pp. 697–728.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ruesch, Jürgen/Kees, Weldon, Nonverbal Communication. Notes on the Visual Perception of Human Relations, Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1956.

    Google Scholar 

  • Streeck, Jürgen, Gesturecraft: the Manu-facture of Meaning, (Gesture Studies, Vol. 2) Amsterdam: Benjamins, 2009.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thomas, Keith, Introduction, in: Bremmer, Jan/Roodenburg, Herman (eds.), A Cultural History of Gesture. From Antiquity to the Present Day, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991, pp. 1–14.

    Google Scholar 

  • Trager, George L., Paralanguage: A first approximation, in: Studies in Linguistics, 13/1958, pp. 1–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • Watzlawick, Paul/Beavin Bavelas, Janet/Jackson, Don D.(eds.), Pragmatics of human communication: A study of interactional patterns, pathologies, and paradoxes, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Mechthild Albert .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2019 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Albert, M. (2019). Nonverbal Communication. In: Kühnhardt, L., Mayer, T. (eds) The Bonn Handbook of Globality. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90377-4_38

Download citation