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National Field Agencies and Their Interviewers

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Population Studies book series (BRIEFSPOPULAT)

Abstract

This chapter describes the tasks and responsibilities of the national fieldwork agencies and their interviewers. The national field agencies in the individual countries participating in a comparative survey are responsible for collecting the data. At this level, it is mainly a matter of implementing the project instructions. Those involved in the actual fieldwork—that is, the supervisors and the interviewers—must be introduced to the fieldwork rules and familiarized with the survey instrument. In addition, the interviewers must be given training to enable them to do their job in accordance with the rules.

Keywords

Project instructions Interviewer training Fieldwork 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Political ScienceJustus Liebig University GiessenGiessenGermany
  2. 2.Methodenzentrum SozialwissenschaftenGeorg-August-Universität GöttingenGöttingenGermany

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