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Ethiopia, Somalia, and the Ogaden: Still a Running Sore at the Heart of the Horn of Africa

  • Sarah Vaughan
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Series in African Borderlands Studies book series (PSABS)

Abstract

This chapter explores the attempts of successive regimes, groups, and movements to reconfigure the toxic regional constellation of Ethio-Somali relations: it locates the intractable issue of the fate of the Ogaden as a long-standing source of poison at the geographical heart of the Horn of Africa. Seen from Ethiopia, the Ogaden has been a periphery: geographically, economically, socially, and politically; and Ethiopian counter-insurgency long attempted to detach its wider trade and cross-border Somali links by force. For Ogaadeen clan members and others across the globe, meanwhile, the Ogaden region was the natural heart of the Somali world, and its brutal impoverishment a source of deep grievance. The chapter considers the complex of contemporary strategies, narratives, and motives that continue to vitiate peace in historical perspective.

Keywords

Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) Somali National Regional State (SNRS) Western Somali Liberation Front (WSLF) Secessionist Claims Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Vaughan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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