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Future Earth: A View from the Rainbow Bridge

  • Li Way Lee
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Advances in Behavioral Economics book series (PABE)

Abstract

We reach out to future generations by mitigating climate risk to them, while they reach us by persuading us to have compassion for them. Both mitigation and persuasion are, therefore, critical to their well-being and our own well-being. They form a feedback loop. As I look closely at the feedback loop, I become concerned that we tend to emphasize mitigation at the expense of persuasion.

Keywords

Climate change Future generations Mitigation Persuasion 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wayne State UniversityDetroitUSA

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